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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Garrison of Fort Jackson

 
 
Garrison of Fort Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
1. Garrison of Fort Jackson Marker
Inscription. Starting in the Summer of 1812, Fort Jackson was garrisoned by various units of the United States Army and Georgia Militia. These troops included the 8th U.S. Infantry, 4th U.S. Artillery, and the Chatham Artillery.
 
Erected by Coastal Heritage Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.918′ N, 81° 2.209′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker can be reached from Fort Jackson Road. Click for map. North (left) off of Presidents Street, Islands Expwy (US80) at Woodcock Street , east (Right) off of Woodcock Street onto Fort Jackson Road,Located at Old Fort Jackson. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31404, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Republican Blues (a few steps from this marker); Construction of Fort Jackson (within shouting distance of this marker); The Napoleon 12-Pounder Field Gun Model 1857 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Colonials at Bonaventure (approx. 2.5 miles away); King Cotton
Garrison of Fort Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Coastal Heritage Society, November 29, 2009
2. Garrison of Fort Jackson Marker
Chatham Artillery Enlisted Man (top)
Chatham Artillery Company Grade Officer (lower)
(approx. 2.6 miles away); Fred Wessels, Senior (approx. 2.7 miles away); Savannah's Liberty Ships and the Atlantic Bridge (approx. 2.7 miles away); Savannah's Early Economy (approx. 2.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar of 1812
 
Fort Jackson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Coastal Heritage Society, November 29, 2009
3. Fort Jackson Marker
8th Infantry Noncommissioned Officer (top)
4th U.S. Artillery Enlisted Man (lower)
National Historic Landmark Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
4. National Historic Landmark Plaque
Fort Jackson, west wall image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
5. Fort Jackson, west wall
Fort Jackson image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
6. Fort Jackson
Fort Jackson east wall image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
7. Fort Jackson east wall
Inside Fort Jackson, Magazine area image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
8. Inside Fort Jackson, Magazine area
Fort Jackson Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
9. Fort Jackson Cannon
Fort Jackson Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
10. Fort Jackson Cannon
Fort Jackson Demi-Bastion, north wall image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
11. Fort Jackson Demi-Bastion, north wall
This is one of four "demi-bastions" in Fort Jackson. They were designed to protect the Fort's walls by firing into the flanks or sides of attacking troops. This demi-bastion had a 32-pounder cannon on a casemate carriage. It sat upon a wooden platform. Cannons were never mounted in the remaining three demi-bastions.
Fort Jackson Blacksmith shop, like this, similar of the times image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
12. Fort Jackson Blacksmith shop, like this, similar of the times
Used today in special programs presented at the Fort.
Fort Jackson Blacksmith shop image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
13. Fort Jackson Blacksmith shop
Fort Jackson Officers' Privy image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
14. Fort Jackson Officers' Privy
This aera was the Officers' Latrine or "Privy Vaults" and was located behind the planned,but never built, Officers' Barracks. The Enlisted Latrines were located to the left and right of this latrine. The lower openings in the brick wall connect to the outer moat; as the tide filled the moat, water flowed into these basins cleaning out the waste. These were in effect flushing toilets. An enclosed wood and brick structure originally stood over these basins. Air shafts rising within the walls provided ventilation.
Officers' Privy image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
15. Officers' Privy
Fort Jackson Enlisted Privy image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
16. Fort Jackson Enlisted Privy
Located here was one of two latrines or "privy vaults." The other enlisted latrine was located where the modern restroom facilities are built. The lower openings in the brick wall connect to the outer moat; as the tide filled the moat, water flowed into these basins cleaning out the waste. In effect these were flushing toilets. An enclosed wood and brick structure originally stood over these basins. Air shafts rising within the walls provided ventilation.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,012 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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