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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Portola Valley in San Mateo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Portola Primary School

 
 
Portola Primary School Marker image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 9, 2009
1. Portola Primary School Marker
Inscription. Portola Primary School was built in 1909. The bell was moved in 1893 from the abandoned Searsville School. The building served as the First town hall when the town of Portola Valley was incorporated in 1964. It was acquired by the town in 1976. Placed on The National Register of Historic Places.

[Second Marker:]
Portola School
The first Portola Valley school stood here from 1894 until 1950, on land donated by Mrs. Andrew Hallidie. It replaced the Searsville School which was abandoned when the Searsville reservoir was created. It contained one classroom, two outer rooms a library alcove with one thousand books as well as a belfry. Many of its students walked or rode ponies from as far away as Skyline or Coal Mine Ridge. In the early years, school closed from December to March because of difficult travel. Enrollment ranged between 40 and 50 until after World War II when the increasing population required the construction of a modern four room school. (Marker Number SMA-025.)
 
Location. 37° 22.922′ N, 122° 13.724′ W. Marker is in Portola Valley, California, in San Mateo County. Marker is on Portola Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 775 Portola Road, Portola Valley CA 94028, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Portola Primary School Marker image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 9, 2009
2. Portola Primary School Marker
At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hallidie Tramway (approx. 0.2 miles away); Our Lady of the Wayside (approx. 0.3 miles away); Town of Searsville (approx. 1.7 miles away); Casa de Tableta (approx. 2 miles away); First Saw Mill (approx. 2.2 miles away); The Chinese Walls (approx. 2.7 miles away); Folger Stable c.1905 (approx. 2.7 miles away); St. Denis Church and Cemetery (approx. 2.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Portola Valley.
 
Regarding Portola Primary School. The building is currently being used as office space for the Portola Valley Elementary School District.
 
Also see . . .  History of Portola Valley. The origins of the modern town of Portola Valley are in the little logging town of Searsville that stood along Sand Hill Road from the 1850s until 1891. It offered services for the men who came to cut the redwoods for the post gold rush building boom. (Submitted on December 1, 2009.) 
 
Categories. EducationNotable Buildings
 
A Second Portola Primary School Marker image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 9, 2009
3. A Second Portola Primary School Marker
Portola Primary School image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 9, 2009
4. Portola Primary School
Portola School image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2007
5. Portola School
Student Quilt Art on Display in the Schoolhouse Window image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2007
6. Student Quilt Art on Display in the Schoolhouse Window
Portola Primary School image. Click for more information.
Library of Congress, Photographer Unknown
7. Portola Primary School
From the Statement of Significance-LOC
The Portola Valley schoolhouse is one of the few remaining turn-of-the-century examples of Mission Revival-styled schools. Its wood construction and use of shingles present a unique expression of this popular style. The architect freely interpreted the popular style with the use of false front curvilinear gables faced with redwood ship-lap and semi-circular fanlights above the front windows and recessed doorway. The exterior is sheathed in cedar shingles and redwood siding lumbered locally. This manipulation of regional materials in a conspicuous effort to execute the style on a small scale resulted in a uniquely attractive design. Built as a one room school house, it remains almost entirely unaltered, and continues to service the neighboring larger school. Its survival is threatened, however, due to its location in the San Andreas rift zone.

[Editor's Note: The "neighboring larger school" mentioned has been torn down due to not meeting earthquake safety codes.]
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by I.G.V.Atajar of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 799 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by I.G.V.Atajar of San Jose, California.   5, 6, 7. submitted on . • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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