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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Menlo Park in San Mateo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Portola Journey's End

November 6 -10, 1769

 
 
Portola Journey's End Marker image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 13, 2009
1. Portola Journey's End Marker
Inscription. Near "El Palo Alto" the tall tree, the Portola Expedition of 63 men and 200 horses and mules camped. They had traveled from San Diego in search of Monterey but discovered instead the Bay of San Francisco. Finding the bay, too large to go around and deciding that Monterey had been by-passed, they ended the search and returned to San Diego.
 
Erected 1968 by State Department of Parks and Recreation, Portola Expedition Bicentennial Foundation. (Marker Number 2.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Historical Landmarks, and the Juan Caspar de Portolį Expedition marker series.
 
Location. 37° 26.872′ N, 122° 10.257′ W. Marker is in Menlo Park, California, in San Mateo County. Marker is on Alma Street near East Creek Drive, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Menlo Park CA 94025, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. El Palo Alto (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); San Francisquito Creek Watershed (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named San Francisquito Creek Watershed (about 400 feet away); History of Tower Well
Portola Journey's End Marker image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 13, 2009
2. Portola Journey's End Marker
(approx. ¼ mile away); The Hostess House War and Veterans Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Hostess House (approx. half a mile away); Menlo Park Railroad Station (approx. 0.8 miles away); Electronics Research Laboratory (approx. 0.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Menlo Park.
 
Regarding Portola Journey's End. This site was designated as California Registered Historical Landmark No.2 on June 1, 1932. This was the second site so honored by the State Office of Historic Preservation.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Gaspar de Portola. This biography of Garspar de Portola gives an account of this search for Monterey. (Submitted on December 1, 2009.) 

2. More information on "El Palo Alto". A Wikipedia article reporting everything you'd ever want to know about this tree. (Submitted on July 27, 2010, by Anthony Applewhite of Atherton, California.) 
 
Categories. Exploration
 
A Second Marker At This Site image. Click for full size.
May 7, 1977
3. A Second Marker At This Site
Under this giant redwood, the Palo Alto, November 6–11, 1769, camped Portola and his band on the expedition that discovered San Francisco Bay. This was the assembling point for their reconnoitering parties. Here in 1774 Padre Palou erected a cross to mark the site of a proposed mission (which later was built at Santa Clara). The celebrated Pedro Font topographical map of 1776 contained the drawing of the original double trunked tree making the Palo Alto the first official living California landmark.
The "El Palo Alto" image. Click for full size.
May 7, 1977
4. The "El Palo Alto"
The "El Palo Alto" image. Click for full size.
By Hyde's Book Store, Palo Alto
5. The "El Palo Alto"
This vintage postcard view of "El Palo Alto" is not dated however the required postage is 1 cent.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by I.G.V.Atajar of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 1,469 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by I.G.V.Atajar of San Jose, California.   3, 4, 5. submitted on . • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Current Photo of "El Palo Alto". • Can you help?
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