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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Republican Blues

 
 
Republican Blues Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
1. Republican Blues Marker
Inscription. During the early months of the Civil War, Fort Jackson's Garrison was composed of local militia units which served rotating tours of duty at the fort. One of these units was the Republican Blues commanded by John Wayne Anderson.
The Blues were first organized in 1808 and had previously served at Fort Jackson during the War of 1812. The Blues, typical of Savannah's old military units, were a fraternal social organization as well as a well trained military unit. Their Civil War service at Fort Jackson began when they were transferred from nearby Wassau Island on November 12, 1861. Their tour of duty at Fort Jackson ended on August 20, 1862.

We are very near fixed and it is the first time I ever saw the Blues satisfied. They are willing to stay in these quarters.
Quote commenting on Fort Jackson from the diary of Lt. William D. Dixon, Republican Blues.
 
Erected by Coastal Heritage Society.
 
Location. 32° 4.92′ N, 81° 2.201′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker is on Fort Jackson Road. Click for map. North (left) off of Presidents Street (US80) at Woodcock Street ,east (right) off of Woodcock Street onto Fort Jackson Road,Located at Old Fort Jackson. Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31404, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Republican Blues Marker image. Click for full size.
By Coastal Heritage Society, November 29, 2009
2. Republican Blues Marker
Republican Blues Officer Field Uniform (top) Republican Blues Enlisted Man Field Uniform (lower)
At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Garrison of Fort Jackson (a few steps from this marker); Construction of Fort Jackson (within shouting distance of this marker); The Napoleon 12-Pounder Field Gun Model 1857 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Colonials at Bonaventure (approx. 2.5 miles away); King Cotton (approx. 2.6 miles away); Fred Wessels, Senior (approx. 2.7 miles away); Savannah's Liberty Ships and the Atlantic Bridge (approx. 2.7 miles away); Savannah's Early Economy (approx. 2.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Savannah.
 
Regarding Republican Blues. 1st Volunteer Regiment of Georgia
Mercer's-Olmstead's Georgia Infantry
Confederate States of America CSA
A Regimental History
Company C: Republican Blues or Independent Republican Blues, Chatham County, (John W. Anderson, George W. Anderson, Jr.)
This company was originally the Davis (William H. Davis) 2nd Republican Blues, Independent Company, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. The term of service for this company appears to have been 60 days. The company disbanded on 20 August 1861. Many of its members reenlisted here in this Olmstead’s 1st Regiment Georgia Volunteer First volunteer regiment of Georgia, which was organized prior to the war, composed of the militia companies of Savannah,
Republican Blues Marker image. Click for full size.
By Coastal Heritage Society, November 29, 2009
3. Republican Blues Marker
Republican Blues Officer Dress Uniform
and commanded by Col. A. R. Lawton. On the appointment of the latter as brigadier-general, H. W. Mercer was elected colonel, and on the latter's promotion to brigadier-general, Charles H. Olmstead was elected colonel, December 26, 1861. He retained command throughout the war.This regiment was on duty at Savannah and Fort Pulaski when Ramsey's regiment was organized. But of these two regiments, Ramsey's was the first to leave the State and the first to see actual war. The First volunteer regiment included the famous old companies--the Republican Blues, German Volunteers, Irish Jasper Greens, Savannah Cadets and Oglethorpe Light Infantry. It was reorganized in October, 1862, and served on the coast until May, 1864.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar of 1812War, US Civil
 
Republican Blues image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
4. Republican Blues
HD. Qtrs. Batteries Below Fort Jackson March 24/62
Special Orders No. 11 Day Signals

"...Enemy landing in force on the Georgia Shore will be indicated by the hoisting of a White Flag with Blue Cross

Enemy landing in force on the Carolina Shore will be indicated by a White Flag with two blue balls.

Enemy landing in force on Elba Island will be indicated by hoisting of a blue flag.

The Day Signal will be answered by lowering the flag
at the post and the Fort."
By order of Edward C. Anderson
Maj. Com d's
The Napoleon 12-Pounder Field Gun Model 1857 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
5. The Napoleon 12-Pounder Field Gun Model 1857
Twelve-pound Napoleon smoothbore cannon image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
6. Twelve-pound Napoleon smoothbore cannon
the mainstay of artillery for both the Union and Confederate armies during the American Civil War
12 pound Mountain Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
7. 12 pound Mountain Howitzer
Mostly used for defense against ground attacks
Demi-bastion image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
8. Demi-bastion
This is one of four "demi-bastions" in Fort Jackson. They were designed to protect the Fort's walls by firing into the flanks or sides of attacking troops. This demi-bastion had a 32-pounder cannon on a casemate carriage. It sat upon a wooden platform. Cannons were never mounted in the remaining three demi-bastions.When the war broke out in 1861, a 12 pound Mountain Howitzer (picture 7, above) was placed at Fort Jackson for use in the demi-bastions.
Coastal Cannon and Magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
9. Coastal Cannon and Magazine
Heavy Artillery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
10. Heavy Artillery
Heavy artillery played a key role in the defense of Savannah during the Civil War. In less than a four mile stretch, the Confederacy had over 50 heavy artillery cannons guarding the Savannah River. The Union was never able to capture Savannah by water. The combination of heavy artillery, the "Mosquito Fleet" (a nickname for the Confederate Naval Squadron), Ironclads, river mines and other obstacles all kept Savannah safe.
Two attempts were made to test the river defensive positions protecting the city in the fall of 1862; both ended with the retreat of the Union Navy. According to a newspaper article which chronicled the details of the second attack, the engagement lasted more than an hour and more than 100 rounds were exchanged. The engagement frightened many of the civilians in Savannah.
Powder Magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
11. Powder Magazine
1812 Powder Magazine This is one of two identical powder magazines built during the initial phase, 1800-1812. Confederate forces used these two rooms for prepared ammunation storage. To protect the magazines and their contents, Confederate engineers erected an armor barrier of railroad iron to shield each of the doorways. The second magazine is hidden by the 1960,s stairway that leads to the parapet.
Powder Magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
12. Powder Magazine
prepared ammunation storage.
Powder Magazine, ammunation storage image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
13. Powder Magazine, ammunation storage
Rations storage in the Magazine as well image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
14. Rations storage in the Magazine as well
Fort Jackson image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
15. Fort Jackson
CSS Georgia model image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
16. CSS Georgia model
Lies just off shore from Fort Jackson, this Ironclad was a part of the "Mosquito Fleet", scuttled to prevent capture. Attempts to reclaim her are ongoing
CSS Savannah model of the "Mosquito Fleet" image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
17. CSS Savannah model of the "Mosquito Fleet"
CSS Atlanta model of the "Mosquito Fleet" image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
18. CSS Atlanta model of the "Mosquito Fleet"
Republican Blues Gaurd room image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
19. Republican Blues Gaurd room
he guard and sentries of the fort lived and operated out of this room. Guards serve two hours on duty and two hours off for a 24 hour period. During the summer months, guards would be rotated from the city twice a day to protect them from disease brought on by mosquitoes and harsh conditions.
14th Sept. 1864... Major Bertody reports that a Yankee prisoner was shot last night between 8 & 9, attempting to pass down between Fort Jackson and Cheves Battery. The moon was shining brilliantly at the time & he evidently fancied himself out of harm's way after getting by the city...
Lt. William Dixon
Republican Blues
Republican Blues guardroom image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
20. Republican Blues guardroom
Republican Blues guard room image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, November 29, 2009
21. Republican Blues guard room
 
 
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