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Edinburg in Shenandoah County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Edinburg Mill

Saved During “The Burning”

 

—1864 Valley Campaign —

 
Edinburg Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
February 2, 2007
1. Edinburg Mill Marker
Inscription. In 1850, George P. Grandstaff announced the opening of the large water-powered grist mill here nearly two years after construction began. This large facility competed with the Whissen Mill also on Stony Creek nearer the center of Edinburg. These two mills, together with the bridge across Stony Creek, were important components of this small Valley town.

During September 1864, Federal Gen. Philip H. Sheridan began “The Burning” – a campaign against the resources of the Shenandoah Valley and the ability of its residents to supply provisions for the main Confederate army then under siege at Petersburg. In a period of 13 days between September 27 and October 9, 1864, Sheridan’s cavalry destroyed more than 1300 structures including mills, barns, furnaces, and tanneries deemed to be of value to the Confederate cause. They also destroyed or confiscated crops, livestock, food, and transportation equipment leaving parts of the Valley a barren wasteland.

Shortly after noon on October 7, the Grandstaff Mill was set ablaze despite the pleas of a crowd of horrified townspeople. There are at least two versions of how the mill was saved. Both tales state that Melvina Grandstaff, granddaughter of the owner, and her friend Nellie Koontz were part of a bucket brigade that quenched the flames. The Whissen mill also was saved
Edinburg Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
December 11, 2009
2. Edinburg Mill Marker
The right of two Civil War Trails Markers at Edinburg Mill.
because effective Confederate sniper fire from the hills behind it kept the Federals from crossing the creek for their assigned task.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 49.251′ N, 78° 34.091′ W. Marker is in Edinburg, Virginia, in Shenandoah County. Marker is at the intersection of Old Valley Turnpike (U.S. 11) and Massie Farm Lane, on the right when traveling south on Old Valley Turnpike. Click for map. Marker is located in the parking lot of the Historic Edinburg Mill. Marker is in this post office area: Edinburg VA 22824, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Stony Creek Line (here, next to this marker); Civil War Action in Edinburg (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Stover - McGinnis House (approx. 2.6 miles away); Last Indian-Settler Conflict (approx. 2.8 miles away); Woodstock (approx. 4.7 miles away); a different marker also named Woodstock (approx. 5.4 miles away); John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg (approx. 5.4 miles away); This Building of (approx. 5.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Edinburg.
 
More about this marker.
Edinburg Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 14, 2014
3. Edinburg Mill Marker
On the right side of the marker is a photo captioned Edinburg Mill as it appeared in the early 1900s. On the left side of the marker is a portrait of Gen. Philip Sheridan.
 
Also see . . .
1. Edinburg. (Submitted on December 11, 2009.)
2. History of the Edinburg Mill. (Submitted on December 11, 2009.)
3. Video documentary recalls destruction of “Breadbasket of the Confederacy”. from Shenandoah Valley.com (Submitted on December 11, 2009.) 

4. Edinburg Mill National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. (Submitted on December 11, 2009.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Historic Edinburg Mill image. Click for full size.
December 11, 2009
4. Historic Edinburg Mill
General Philip Sheridan image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 14, 2014
5. General Philip Sheridan
Close-up of photo on marker
Edinburg Mills image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 14, 2014
6. Edinburg Mills
Edinburg Mills, Edinburg, VA. This mill was built in 1848 by Major George Grandstaff, whose grandfather, Philip Bishop, an Edinburg pioneer, was captured by the Indians. Returning Several years later , the Valley still on the frontier, Bishop feared to retain his name and called himself Grandstaff. During the Civil War the mill escaped the brand of Sheridan's raiders. Twice set on fire, women of the town pled with Union officers, quartered nearby to save the remaining flour, and as a result Confederate women and Union officers carried water to quench the flames. The charred timbers may be seen this day.
Close-up of photo on display at Edinburg Mill
Edinburg Mill 1848 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 14, 2014
7. Edinburg Mill 1848
The Mill House, 1850 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 14, 2014
8. The Mill House, 1850
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on . This page has been viewed 1,275 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on .   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on .   5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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