Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Redwood City in San Mateo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Eureka Corner

 
 
Eureka Corner Marker image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 9, 2009
1. Eureka Corner Marker
Inscription. A hotel on this site, owned by Harry N. Morse and Daniel W. Balch, was the site of the first town meeting in 1854. Residents rejected a Mezesville government.
 
Erected 1967 by Yerba Buena Chapter E Clampus Vitus.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 37° 29.188′ N, 122° 13.588′ W. Marker is in Redwood City, California, in San Mateo County. Marker is on Main Street near Broadway Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Hotel is located on the corner of Broadway and Main Streets with the marker facing Main Street. Marker is in this post office area: Redwood City CA 94063, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Diller-Chamberlain Gen. Store/American Hotel-American House/Sequoia Hotel/Bank of San Mateo County (within shouting distance of this marker); Alhambra Theater (within shouting distance of this marker); The Pioneer Store (within shouting distance of this marker); Embarcadero Turning Basin Site (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Redwood City War Memorial
Eureka Corner image. Click for full size.
By I.G.V.Atajar, November 9, 2009
2. Eureka Corner
Marker is seen mounted on the wall.
(about 700 feet away); Former Site of Sequoia High School (about 700 feet away); Sequoia Union High School (about 700 feet away); New Sequoia/Fox Theatre (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Redwood City.
 
Also see . . .  Redwood City - Downtown Yesterday. A small community had sprung up due to logging in the Santa Cruz Mountains and the ablility to ship the lumber from here to the growing city of San Francisco. However, the land was owned by Simon Mezes. Rather than fight the fact that a town had sprung up, Mezes ordered surveys and drew up a subdivision map for a formal town, called it "Mezesville," and told the people living on his property to pay for the lots they were occupying or to get off the land and allow others to buy. The standard price for a lot was $75. The squatters reluctantly accepted this situation, writing into their deeds such sour phrases as "the so-called town of Mezesville" or "according to the Mezesville map." However, they went on calling their town Redwood, or Redwood Landing, and when they got a post office in 1856, they called it Redwood City. (Submitted on December 16, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by I.G.V.Atajar of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 898 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by I.G.V.Atajar of San Jose, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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