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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

African Americans in the Texas Revolution

 
 
African Americans in the Texas Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, September 3, 2007
1. African Americans in the Texas Revolution Marker
Inscription. Many African Americans, free and slave, supported Texas during its 1835-36 war of independence from Mexico. Although official recognition of the African American role was generally denied, recorded accounts of individual acts of bravery and patriotism survived.

Hendrick Arnold distinguished himself as a guide and soldier for Ben Milamís Texas Army at the Siege of Bexar and later at the Battle of San Jacinto.

William E. (Bill) Goyens, a prominent African American businessman of Nacogdoches, served as an interpreter and liaison for Sam Houston during treaty negotiations with the Cherokee Indians at the outset of the war.

Samuel McCullough, Jr., a freeman, was severely wounded in the Goliad Campaign in late 1835 and later recognized by the Texas Congress as among the first to shed blood in the Texas War for Independence.

Joe Travis was among the few defenders of the Alamo to survive the devastating siege by Mexican General Santa Anna in 1836. Travis later carried news of the battle to General Sam Houston.

African Americans are counted among the Texas Army massacred at Goliad, among those who contributed money and transported supplies for the Texas Army, and among those who died defending the Alamo.
 
Erected 1994 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker
African Americans in the Texas Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Heinich, August 24, 2014
2. African Americans in the Texas Revolution Marker
Number 13929.)
 
Location. 30° 16.362′ N, 97° 44.462′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of West 11th Street and Congress Avenue. Click for map. In a park at the southwest corner. Marker is in this post office area: Austin TX 78701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas (here, next to this marker); Governor Edmund Jackson Davis (here, next to this marker); Governor James Edward Ferguson August 31, 1871 -September 21, 1944 (here, next to this marker); Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton (here, next to this marker); Governor Elisha Marshall Pease (here, next to this marker); Henry Smith (here, next to this marker); Site of Second Travis County Courthouse and Walton Building (here, next to this marker); The Texas Capitol (here, next to this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Austin.
 
Categories. African AmericansMilitaryWar, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,061 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   2. submitted on , by Michael Heinich of Austin, Texas. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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