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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Mitchell in Russell County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery

 
 
Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
1. Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery Marker
Inscription. This military graveyard was established soon after Fort Mitchell was built by General John Floyd of the Georgia Militia. Located just south of the stockade, the cemetery was used between 1813 and 1840 during the fort's occupation by Georgia and United States soldiers. The first burial was that of John Ward, an interpreter on the staff of General Floyd. Ward died of pneumonia in November 1813. A line of approximately 25 soldiers' graves is located adjacent to the site of the fort's dispensary. A burial ground for area residents is situated on higher grounds just to the south. The Yuchi leader, Timpoochee Barnard, is said to be interred nearby.
 
Erected 1986 by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission / Fort Mitchell Historical Society.
 
Location. 32° 20.772′ N, 85° 1.134′ W. Marker is in Fort Mitchell, Alabama, in Russell County. Marker can be reached from U.S. 165. Click for map. This marker is located on the grounds of the Fort Mitchell Historic Landmark Park, about half-mile from the main entrance on the road to the site of the fort on the right passed the Cantey Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 561 Highway 165, Fort Mitchell AL 36856, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery Marker and Road to the Fort Site image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
2. Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery Marker and Road to the Fort Site
of this marker. John Crowell (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Asbury School and Mission (about 300 feet away); James Cantey (about 300 feet away); Fort Mitchell (about 500 feet away); Archaeology And Our Understanding of the Creek People (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Creek Nation / The Chattahoochee Indian Heritage Center (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Creeks Today (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Creek Trail of Tears (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Mitchell.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Mitchell in the Encyclopedia of Alabama. (Submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesForts, CastlesMilitaryNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery Gravesites image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
3. Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery Gravesites
John Ward - 1813 Indian Interpreter Gravestone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
4. John Ward - 1813 Indian Interpreter Gravestone Marker
Maj. Timpoochee Barnard Yuchi Leader Gravestone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
5. Maj. Timpoochee Barnard Yuchi Leader Gravestone Marker
Major Timpoochee Barnard - "Yuchi Leader." image. Click for full size.
By Charles Bird King, circa 1825
6. Major Timpoochee Barnard - "Yuchi Leader."
Bob Walton (Timor Bob) Revolutionary Soldier Gravestone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
7. Bob Walton (Timor Bob) Revolutionary Soldier Gravestone Marker
Tom Carr Indian Trader Gravestone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
8. Tom Carr Indian Trader Gravestone Marker
Daniel McGillivray SGT with CPT Seale Gravestone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
9. Daniel McGillivray SGT with CPT Seale Gravestone Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,732 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   6. submitted on , by Annmarie Josephine Christian of Southampton, Massachusetts.   7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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