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MARKER DATABASE
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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Furley Hall

 
 
Furley Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Laura Ashley Cooper
1. Furley Hall Marker
Inscription. On hill to the north stood the Georgian mansion built c. 1775 by Daniel Bowley II (1745–1807), Baltimore merchant and patriot of the revolution. He was a town commissioner, 1771–1778, and three times a State Senator. In 1814, British soldiers occupied the estate. It was purchased in 1847 by William Corse, Sr. (1804–1869), whose garden was a favorite of his friends Enoch Pratt and Johns Hopkins. Damaged by fire in 1906, Furley Hall was razed in 1953.
 
Erected by Maryland Bicentennial Commission, Maryland Historical Trust, Maryland State Highway Administration.
 
Location. 39° 19.431′ N, 76° 33.669′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker is at the intersection of Parkside Drive and Boehms Lane on Parkside Drive. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Baltimore MD 21206, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. World War I Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Mounted Messengers (approx. 1.4 miles away); Montebello (approx. 1.5 miles away); Patapsco Friends Meeting House (approx. 1.9 miles away); Recinoso (approx.
Furley Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 20, 2007
2. Furley Hall Marker
2.2 miles away); Spanish American War Monument (approx. 2.2 miles away); St. Francis Xavier Church (approx. 2.3 miles away); St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church (approx. 2.3 miles away); Lt. Owen E. Sweeney, Jr. Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Ouija Board (approx. 2.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Also see . . .  Furley Hall Marker. I reported this marker missing in the summer of 2009. Today (January 18, 2011) I noticed that it is back in place on the NW corner of Brehms & Parkside. To the responsible party(ies) who put it back up, thank you for your efforts.

Editor's Note: Thank you for letting us know the marker is back in place. (Submitted on January 18, 2011, by Ron Grissom of Baltimore, Maryland.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Does the marker indicate the actual site of Furley Hall?
I am R. David Schaaf and I lived on St. Thomas Avenue (now Moravia Boulevard), very close to the Furley Hall site as a child. Does anyone know the extent of the grounds of Furley Hall?

There must
Furley Hall from the lane image. Click for full size.
circa 1895
3. Furley Hall from the lane
have been surrounding estate land associated with the house. Does the marker actually indicate the site of the house?

H. Chandlee Forman, architect and architectural historian writes in his 1966 book, "Tidewater Maryland Architecture and Gardens" about the demolition of the site of Furley Hall in May of 1953. He made extensive notes and measured drawings concerning the outbuildings and the remains of the gardens of the house that existed until the middle of the twentieth century. I remember walking with my father as a child through these obvious ruins. H. Chandlee Forman suggests in his book that the foundation of Furley Hall was extant until the mid-twentieth century as well - with a Victorian confection of a house built atop it - and imperfectly at that. I remember seeing that house.

The house and its foundation were not on the Herring Run side of Bowley's Lane, but on the opposite side of Bowley's Lane - so that the lane ran between the house and the Run. I have a photograph of my brother and I standing on a hill in mid-winter, on St. Thomas Avenue (now Moravia Boulevard), and the camera is pointed southwest into the Herring Run Valley. In the photograph, the stone barn that H. Chandlee Forman documents in his 1966 book is in the photograph at a distance near Bowleys Lane.

Forman has a colorful and rueful story about the difficulty of documenting
Parlor at Furley Hall image. Click for full size.
circa 1895
4. Parlor at Furley Hall
the overgrown ruins and the diffident renters that would not allow him to properly document the site before everything was demolished to produce the current row house neighborhood. But I still wonder - is the marker truly located where the house was located, for I believe that it may not be.

Any information concerning this subject would be of interest to me. My uncle and aunt, Charles and Lenetta Burton owned almost the entire hillside above the site of Furley Hall on the northeast side of Bowleys lane when I was a boy.

Editor's Note: Thank you for your comment. We regret we cannot help with your questions. Perhaps one of our readers can help?
    — Submitted January 31, 2009, by Roland David Schaaf of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

2. The Green Rose of Furley Hall and the Underground Railroad
Helen Corse Barney wrote of a Quaker family's experiences with the Underground Railroad during the mid 1800s, in her book, 'The Green Rose of Furley Hall' it explained how the family of nurserymen on the estate in Baltimore were known for raising a novelty plant, the green rose. Rosa viridiflora plants original to Furley Hall were in existence until the property was bulldozed in 1953, the same day Henry Chandlee Forman was writing the history and sketching as much as
Furley Hall Floor Plans image. Click for full size.
sketched by Henry Chandlee Forman, 1953
5. Furley Hall Floor Plans
This image may not be copied to be published elsewhere without the written permission of the submitter.
he could to remember the estate in one of his books 'Tidewater Maryland Architecture and Gardens'. Folklore holds that Underground conductors wore a green rose as a wordless signal during their dangerous missions. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted December 28, 2009.

3.
The marker went missing last summer 2009 while the city had a contractor repaving part of Parkside .City services say they have no information about same. I hope this has not found its way to scrap metal.

Editor's Note: Thank you for the update. Sad to hear it's missing, and hope to see it replaced soon.
    — Submitted February 24, 2010, by Phillip McLaughlin of Baltimore, Maryland.

4. Furley Hall
I grew up around Furley Hall in 1960's. Have always had an intrest in the site and believe I located the foundation as a boy. I would love to see any photos that anyone could produce of the site. Also the folks who have sent info to this sight might consider forming an informal group to exchange info or stories.
Jim Weller

Editor's Note: Thank you for your interest in the Historical Marker database. We are glad
Furley Hall Back Porch image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Jayne Larion, circa 1895
6. Furley Hall Back Porch
Corse's daughter, Caroline, Mother, Deborah Sinclair Corse, and son-in-law, Calvin Conard, of Philadelphia (husband of Annie Clark Corse).
to have provided you with a link to your youth related to this marker. Regrettably, we are not affiliated with the organzations who researched, sponsored or maintain this marker, so can't help with your suggestion. However, if you wish to coordinate such a group, with your permission, we can send your contact info to them with that in mind.
    — Submitted January 28, 2011, by Jim Weller of Baltimore, Maryland.

 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismPoliticsWar of 1812War, US Revolutionary
 
Sketch of Furley Hall Ice House image. Click for full size.
By Henry Chandlee Forman (sketcher)
7. Sketch of Furley Hall Ice House
This image may not be copied to be published elsewhere without the written permission of the submitter.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 4,616 times since then and 89 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Laura Ashley Cooper of Jarrettsville, Md, USA.   2. submitted on , by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on , by Jayne Larion of Grand Blanc, Michigan.   5. submitted on , by Laura Ashley Cooper of Jarrettsville, Md, USA.   6. submitted on , by Jayne Larion of Grand Blanc, Michigan.   7. submitted on , by Laura Ashley Cooper of Jarrettsville, Md, USA. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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