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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Deadwood in Lawrence County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Wild Bill

 
 
Wild Bill Marker, prior to re-cast in bronze image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 1979
1. Wild Bill Marker, prior to re-cast in bronze
Korczak Ziolkowski,sculptor : Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture, Smithsonian American Art Museum (SIRIS)Control Number: IAS SD000072
Inscription.
Scout for the Pioneers
Scout for the Union Army
Marshall for Hay City
Dodge City and Abeline
Killed in Deadwood
August 2, 1876
Buried on Mount Moriah
300 feet above this spot

Presented to the City of Deadwood
By George R. Hunter
 
Erected 1951.
 
Location. 44° 22.569′ N, 103° 43.735′ W. Marker is in Deadwood, South Dakota, in Lawrence County. Marker is on Sherman Street near Lee Street and Miller Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Deadwood SD 57732, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sherman Street and the East Side (within shouting distance of this marker); The Great Flood (within shouting distance of this marker); Civic Stability (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fire of 1879 (about 400 feet away); Deadwood City 1876 (about 500 feet away); Waite Block Annex (about 500 feet away); Gold Discovery in the Great Sioux Reservation (about 500 feet away); Gold in the Gulch (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Deadwood.
 
Regarding Wild Bill. The bust was donated to the city of
Wild Bill Marker image. Click for full size.
Deadwood Archives, circa 1950
2. Wild Bill Marker
Deadwood by George Hunter, a local businessman who was a friend and supporter of Korczak Ziolkowski, sculptor of Crazy Horse Memorial. The bust was a gift to Hunter out of gratitude for his support of Ziolkowski’s Crazy Horse endeavor. His "Wild Bill Hickok" granite sculpture was a gift to the town of Deadwood, South Dakota.
This piece was originally carved in 1951.
Carved out of light-colored granite, the bust depicts Hickok’s head and one shoulder. It has an air of wildness about it, from the upturned, expectant tilt of his head to the blowing hair and mountain-man style hat and coat he wears. It almost appears as if
Hickok is gazing expectantly toward his next adventure in the Hills.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wild Bill Hickok. His skills as a gunfighter and scout, along with his reputation as a lawman, provided the basis for his fame, although some of his exploits are fictionalized. His nickname of Wild Bill has inspired similar nicknames for men known for their daring in various fields. (Submitted on January 7, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. City of Deadwood. While the gold rush of 1876 brought the likes of Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane, it also provided the wealth to construct a thriving commercial center in the heart of the Black Hills of South Dakota. (Submitted on January 7, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. Tributes to Bill
James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
3. James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok
an American frontiersman who had been a stagecoach driver, a Union army scout, and a United States Marshall.
. The bust was rededicated in 1994 after it had been removed to create a bronze cast. The original pedestal had been destroyed during the bust’s absence, so a second was created to replace it. (Submitted on January 7, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Wild Bill Hickok image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
4. Wild Bill Hickok
Hickok 1869. Because a knife would not have been worn unsheathed, it is likely a photographer's prop. Although buckskins are often seen in movies depicting earlier periods, Hickok was one of the first to wear them.
Wild Bill Hickok, present day gravesite image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
5. Wild Bill Hickok, present day gravesite
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,890 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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