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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Gustine in Merced County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Gustine Museum

Merced County Courthouse/Jail

 
 
Gustine Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 7, 2008
1. Gustine Museum Marker
Inscription. This Mission Revival Style building, the only surviving one of four, constructed in 1911 in Gustine as a justice court and served as Township No. 6's jail from 1911 to 1980. Leased by the Gustine Historical Society in 1985 and refurbished with the aid of many donations and volunteers it was reopened in 1990 as the Gustine Museum. August 11, 1995 it was designated to be a California Point of Historical Interest.
Dedicated in
Truth, Liberty, and Toleration
April 14, 1996
By The
Grand Parlor, Native Sons of the Golden West
Mervyn J. Fauss, Grand President

 
Erected 1996 by Grand Parlor, Native Sons of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 37° 15.397′ N, 120° 59.918′ W. Marker is in Gustine, California, in Merced County. Marker is on 4th Street north of 4th Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 397 4th Street, Gustine CA 95322, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Enterprise School (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Men of Gustine War Memorial
Gustine Museum (with marker visible to the right of the entrance) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 7, 2008
2. Gustine Museum (with marker visible to the right of the entrance)
The "tombstone" on the lawn to the right of the entrance is a memorial to Dr. A.W. Gustafson.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Founding Day April 28, 1888 (approx. 4.3 miles away); Orestimba (approx. 6.6 miles away); West of This Point is the California Aqueduct (approx. 6.6 miles away); Hills Ferry (approx. 6.6 miles away); United States Submariners Memorial (approx. 10.7 miles away); San Joaquin Valley National Cemetery (approx. 10.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Gustine.
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted to the right of the entrance of the building.
 
Also see . . .  History of Gustine (Gustine Historical Society). The Merced County Justice Court/Jail was built in 1911 by Roy Kruger and A.D. Davenport at a cost of $5,900. It is of reinforced concrete construction throughout and was designed in a Spanish style with a plaster finish and a metal tile roof. “It is a little smaller than some of the other county buildings, but is the equal of any of them in architecture.” (Submitted on January 8, 2010.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Dr. A.W. Gustafson Memorial Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 7, 2008
3. Dr. A.W. Gustafson Memorial Plaque
The plaque reads, "1881-1952, Dr. A.W. Gustafson. In Memoriam. To a life dedicated to the welfare of the children of this community."

The Gustine Historical Society on 'Dr. Gus':"... an office or home visit was $1 and if the doctor came more than once a day it was still only $1. A baby was delivered for $25. If you had to see a specialist or another doctor, he took you in his own car from Gustine to wherever the other doctor was located. If he took you for a stay at a hospital, he would also pick you up and bring you home."
Gustine Museum (formerly the courthouse and jail) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 7, 2008
4. Gustine Museum (formerly the courthouse and jail)
Gustine Historical Society: "Gustine pioneer A.D. Davenport built the Justice Court/Jail in 1911. He recalled how the first prisoner in the new jail was leaning against the door when suddenly it came open and he fell out. Fearing extra punishment if he ran away, the prisoner reported the incident to the constable, Mr. Oliver Carey. The Constable then notified Mr. Davenport. Mr. Davenport couldn’t understand why the door had come open as he had purchased a very expensive lock to put on the door. Carey and Davenport then returned to the jail and the constable locked Mr. Davenport in the cell. Mr. Davenport leaned against the door for awhile and to his surprise the door flew open and he fell out. The faulty lock was repaired and there have been no 'jail breaks' in Gustine since."
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,033 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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