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Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Evacuation of Richmond

 
 
Evacuation of Richmond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, January 13, 2010
1. Evacuation of Richmond Marker
Inscription. On Sunday morning, April 2, 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was notified while in church that Petersburg was falling. By noon, the evacuation of the Confederate government and army from Richmond was set in motion. Late Sunday evening, a train left Danville Station carrying Davis and other officials, and during the night the Confederate troops guarding Richmond marched out to the southwest.

Before dawn on Monday, April 3rd, naval vessels and military stores were blown up, bringing people out on the streets. Many gathered near Shockoe Slip where warehouses of provisions had been opened up. Looting began and mobs formed, attracting deserters, escaped prisoners, and others, many drunk on whiskey.

Around 7:30 a.m. on the 3rd, the last Confederate forces moved out of Richmond crossing Mayo’s Bridge at 14th Street. The bridge was set fire just as the first Union soldiers arrived. Chaos reigned.
 
Location. 37° 32.267′ N, 77° 26.302′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Cary Street and South 8th Street. Click for map. This marker is located along the Dominion Building plaza. Marker is at or near this postal address: 701 East Cary Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Evacuation of Richmond Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, January 13, 2010
2. Evacuation of Richmond Marker
markers are within walking distance of this marker. Evacuation Fire (here, next to this marker); Downtown Richmond Millsites (within shouting distance of this marker); Basin Race (within shouting distance of this marker); Kanawha Plaza (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Canal Walk (about 400 feet away); The First National Bank Building (about 500 feet away); Richmond Evacuation Fire (about 700 feet away); Great Turning Basin (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. On top is an image of the "Evacuation of Richmond" with the caption, "View north, Mayo’s Bridge at 14th Street in foreground. This 1865 Currier & Ives print, while dramatic, is not historically accurate. The bridges, including Mayo’s, were set fire early, before the flames had spread through the city, and before the Arsenal went up and its shells began to explode. (Courtesy of Valentine Museum)"
 
Also see . . .
1. The Fall of Richmond. Civil War Preservation Trust. (Submitted on January 18, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. The Fall of Richmond. Historynet-America’s Civil War. (Submitted on January 18, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
3. The Fall of Richmond. Civil War Richmond. (Submitted on January 18, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Notable EventsWar, US Civil
 
The fall of Richmond, Va. on the night of April 2d. 1865 image. Click for full size.
By Currier & Ives, circa 1865
3. The fall of Richmond, Va. on the night of April 2d. 1865
This strong hold the Capital City of the Confederacy, was evacuated by the Rebels in consequence of the defeat at "Five forks" of the Army of Northern Virginia under Lee, and capture of the South side Rail-Road by Genl Grant. Before abandoning the City, the Rebels set fire to it, destroying a vast amount of property; and the conflagration continued until it was subdued by the Union troops on the following morning.
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-pga-03629]
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,518 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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