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Phoenix in Maricopa County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast

In Memory of the Crew of the U.S.S. Arizona (BB39)

 
 
U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker Plaque image. Click for full size.
January 18, 2010
1. U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker Plaque
In Wesley Bolin Memorial Park, Arizona State Capitol Concourse.

Click on Photo for easier reading of text.
Inscription. The upper 26 feet of the mast before you is the top portion of the main mast of the U.S.S. Arizona and is known as the signal mast or "pig-stick". The battleship U.S.S. Arizona (BB 39) was sunk at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The superstructure above the waterline was removed soon after the attack. Admiral Earnest H. King, Chief of Naval Operations, sent the signal mast to his hometown of Lorain, Ohio. Commander Edwin C. Keyes, a close friend of Adm. King commanded that naval armory in Lorain. He had the mast modified and erected at the armory to be used for training purposes. The Navy added the yards (cross pieces). Allen Permach of Lorain Steel Fabricators, made the other modifications including the 36 ft. length added to the botton of the Arizona's original 26 ft. mast. The vertical shaft represents the 1177 crewmen who gave their lives on that "Day of Infamy". The yard stands for all those who served aboard.

The Arizona's modified signal mast was used until the armory was razed in 1980. It was offered to the city of Lorain, but was refused. In order to save the mast from destruction, Cdr. Keyes obtained authorization from the Navy for Brenne H. Donofrio, a naval engineer to take possession of it. Nick A. Donofrio, the father of Brenne H. Donofrio was a close friend of Adm. King and Cdr. Keyes, and had been honored by the Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Navy for having donated several important inventions to the Navy during World War II. The mast
U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, February 13, 2010
2. U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker
Marker is by the bench just south of the Signal Mast.
was moved to Brenne H. Donofrio's property where it was stored for 10 years.

Robert Manzetti, a retired rairoad engineer from Ohio, learned of the mast while visiting his daughter who lived near Lorain. Mr. Manzetti and Dr. Earl L. Field, a professor at Arizona College of the Bible and both residents of Glendale, Arizona formed the U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Committee. The Committee purchased the mast, transported it to Arizona and erected it here in Wesley Bolin Plaza. It was dedicated and donated to the State of Arizona on December 7, 1990. All funds and work on the mast came from private donations.

"I was told to be very careful in its installation as it was valuable to the men who gave their lives defending it" Allen A. Perhach

U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Committee Robert Manzetti - Earl Field James Walker - Calvin Brice - Michael Aicone

Grateful Acknowledgement to Adobe Sandblasting - Almond & Stephens Architects - The Arizona Republic (newspaper) Arizona College of the Bible - Arizona Sign Assoc. - Central Arizona Trophy Dealers Assoc. - Karsten Manufacturing Corp. KTSP-TV Ch. 10 - Martin Bergan - Port-A-Fab Wielding - Snow & Assoc. Engineering R.J. Carli Engineering - Swift Transportation Co. - Thos. Manzetti Painting Humana - Arizona Skilled Building Trade Unions and Apprentices

Governor Rose Mofford
 
Erected 1990 by U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Committee.
 
Location. 33° 26.888′ 
U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker Plaque - Close-up Relief Art image. Click for full size.
January 18, 2010
3. U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker Plaque - Close-up Relief Art
N, 112° 5.628′ W. Marker is in Phoenix, Arizona, in Maricopa County. Marker can be reached from West Washington Street. Click for map. Marker is located at Wesley Bolin Memorial Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1501 West Washington Street, Phoenix AZ 85007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Arizona World War II Memorial (a few steps from this marker); The Arizona Korean War Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Father Albert Braun O.F.M. (within shouting distance of this marker); Arizona's U.S.S. Arizona Memorial - In Memory of the Gallant Men (within shouting distance of this marker); Jewish War Veterans Memorial (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Vietnam Veterans Memorial (about 300 feet away); Memorial to Arizona Confederate Troops (about 300 feet away); Navajo Code Talkers (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Phoenix.
 
Additional keywords. Battleship Row, Day of Infamy, Tora Tora Tora, Patriotism, Battleships
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesWar, World II
 
U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast image. Click for full size.
January 18, 2010
4. U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast
Arizona's U.S.S. Arizona Monument Aerial View image. Click for full size.
By USGS/Terraserver/Google Earth, circa January 1, 2007
5. Arizona's U.S.S. Arizona Monument Aerial View
The Signal Mast, Time Capsule, Anchor and Casualty Memorial are pointed out in this image.
U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, February 13, 2010
6. U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast
View north from sidewalk just south of mast.
The Wesley Bolin Memorial Park and Old Capitol Dome/Museum image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Chris English, January 18, 2010
7. The Wesley Bolin Memorial Park and Old Capitol Dome/Museum
Due West from the U.S.S. Arizona Signal Mast Marker The old State Capitol is a museum. The impressive U.S.S. Arizona punch bowl and silver service is displayed inside. Them ol' boys knew how to drink in style.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on . This page has been viewed 3,715 times since then and 74 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on .   2. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   3, 4. submitted on .   5. submitted on .   6. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   7. submitted on . • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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