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Bethlehem in Northampton County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Restoration of the Nain-Schober House

429 Heckewelder Place

 
 
Restoration of the Nain-Schober House Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2009
1. Restoration of the Nain-Schober House Marker
Inscription.
This is the last remaining home from the American Indian mission village of Nain which existed from 1758-1765 in the vicinity of 12th and 13th Avenues in West Bethlehem. The house was originally built around 1758 by Moravian missionaries with help from American Indians. It was a log structure with a wood-shingled roof. In 1765 the home was sold to Andreas Schober, a Bethlehem Moravian, who moved the house up the street to the southwest corner of W. Market Street and Heckewelder Place. In 1906 it was moved to this location.

The current metal panel siding is temporarily protecting the building as various aspects of restoration are being conducted. The structure will be restored to its c.1780 appearance, as illustrated in the drawing above. Andreas Schober, a Moravian mason, dramatically altered the building from its original log appearance shortly after moving it to Bethlehem. Schober added a clay tile roof and parged the exterior walls. A lime-based parging (a masonry application reminiscent of today's stucco) covered the logs to protect them. The parging was then scored to imitate coursed masonry.

Why not keep this as a log structure?
The only time the building stood with its logs exposed was in the Nain mission village. Once the structure was moved to Bethlehem, it was restyled and the logs were parged
Nain-Schober House Restoration Sponsors image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2009
2. Nain-Schober House Restoration Sponsors
on the exterior. Therefore, it would not be accurate to the history of the house or of the community to restore it to its original log appearance. Some logs were damaged or missing; parging the exterior will protect the structure from inclement weather and invading pests.
 
Erected by Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Pennsylvania Heritage Parks Program, and the Moravian Museum of Bethlehem.
 
Location. 40° 37.181′ N, 75° 22.878′ W. Marker is in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in Northampton County. Marker is on Heckewelder Place, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. House is about 200 feet north of Central Moravian Church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 429 Heckewelder Place, Bethlehem PA 18018, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); First Bethlehem Pharmacy (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Old Chapel (within shouting distance of this marker); Moravian Community (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); First House of Moravian Settlement (about 300 feet away);
Nain-Schober House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 22, 2009
3. Nain-Schober House and Marker
Looking NNW along Heckewelder Place.
Central Moravian Church (about 300 feet away); Smith Complex (about 300 feet away); Gemein Haus (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Bethlehem.
 
Also see . . .
1. Restoration Notice (Bottom Right of Page). (Submitted on February 5, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Indian Missions of the Middle Atlantic States. (Submitted on February 5, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Nain Mission Village in Labrador, Canada. (Submitted on February 5, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraMan-Made FeaturesNative AmericansNotable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 979 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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