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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Clayton in Contra Costa County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Black Diamond Way

 
 
Black Diamond Way Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 22, 2009
1. Black Diamond Way Marker
Inscription. In 1892 Contra Costa County named Black Diamond Way, and maintained it as a road until 1982. (Locally it was also known as "Nortonville Road".) Black Diamond Way became part of Black Diamond Mt. Diablo Regional Trail in 1985.

Black Diamond District coal mines operated from 1861 until circa 1900. Between 1867 and 1883 they produced over 100,000 tons annually. Coal was hauled to river landings by teams and rail.

Miners and families from Mt. Diablo coalfield towns crossed Mt. Diablo Creek for supplies, services, and recreation. Inns and saloons outnumbered other establishments.

The City of Clayton dedicated Black Diamond Plaza on October 28, 2000.

Clayton Historical Society 2005
 
Erected 2005 by Clayton Historical Society.
 
Location. 37° 56.47′ N, 121° 56.01′ W. Marker is in Clayton, California, in Contra Costa County. Marker is at the intersection of Marsh Creek Road and Main Street, on the right on Marsh Creek Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Clayton CA 94517, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Growler Saloon – Goethals Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Clayton Post Office
Black Diamond Way Plaza and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 22, 2009
2. Black Diamond Way Plaza and Marker
(about 400 feet away); The Joel Clayton House (about 400 feet away); Joaquin Murrieta (about 400 feet away); The Clayton Club (about 400 feet away); Clayton (about 700 feet away); Endeavor Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away); De Martini Winery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Clayton.
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted on a stone monument on the east side of the plaza, at the start of Black Diamond Way.
 
Also see . . .
1. Coal Mining. The Clayton Historical Society on Clayton and the Mt. Diablo coal mines: "By 1860, there were six miles of mines stretching between the towns of Somersville and Nortonville, and Judsonville and Stewartville. Clayton, only a few miles from the activity of the Mt. Diablo Coalfield, responded immediately to the demand for services and supplies. By 1861, Clayton had become the hub of activities in the area. With miners walking over the hills for supplies and entertainment, Clayton became a bustling community with hotels, a general store, school, tavern
It's a long way to Delaware Bay.... image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 22, 2009
3. It's a long way to Delaware Bay....
Trails go in a number of directions from Black Diamond Way Plaza.
and two churches. Roaring tumultuous clamor filled the streets of Clayton as hordes of prospectors, miners and settlers poured into the valley. Food, mining supplies, and land were in big demand, and prices soared. By 1868, the early “boom” period of the Coalfield, Clayton, one of the largest cities in Contra Costa County, had a population of 900." (Submitted on February 13, 2010.) 

2. Black Diamond Mines. The Greenbelt Alliance's description of several hiking routes in the area, including the Black Diamond Way. Includes a short history of mining in the area. (Submitted on February 13, 2010.) 
 
Additional keywords. mining
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRoads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,083 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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