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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Jackson in Amador County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

- Jackson -

The Jumping Seat of Calaveras County

 
 
- Jackson - The Jumping Seat of Calaveras County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, February 13, 2010
1. - Jackson - The Jumping Seat of Calaveras County Marker
Inscription. Judge Smith proclaimed Jackson the Seat of Justice after Clerk Collier canvassed the votes of the May 1851 election in which 1224 votes were cast for Moquelumne Hill and 1014 for Jackson. An armed party from Moquelumne Hill pursued Judge Smith to lynch him. Another party stole the records from the clerkís office. Later Judge Smith shot and killed Collier on Main Street over another disputed election count. A perfect example of Mother Lode politics.

- Erected by -
Chapter No.49 – E Clampus Vitus
May 11, 5979 A.D.
Anno Dumbellicus

 
Erected 1974 by E Clampus Vitus, Chapter 49.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 38° 20.937′ N, 120° 46.456′ W. Marker is in Jackson, California, in Amador County. Marker can be reached from Main Street near Court Street, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 105 Main Street, Jackson CA 95642, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Brumel's Building (here, next to this marker); Levy & Co. (a few steps from this marker); Pioneer Hall
- Jackson - The Jumping County Seat of Calaveras County image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, February 13, 2010
2. - Jackson - The Jumping County Seat of Calaveras County
From the Jackson Walking Tour Brochure:
"Proceedings of the Calaveras County Court of Sessions or supervisors were held near hear in the then French Hotel. Jackson was county seat of Calaveras County briefly from July 1851 until about May, 1852 before Mokelumne Hill claimed the prize."
(a few steps from this marker); Steckler's Building (a few steps from this marker); Weller Hardware, Pioneer Hall (a few steps from this marker); Stampfly's Tent, Republic House (a few steps from this marker); S. Harris Clothing Store (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Bakery, Early Amador Dispatch (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Jackson.
 
More about this marker. The marker is embedded in the sidewalk on the west side of Main Street.

Note the difference in spelling of Mokelumne between this article (the current spelling) and the spelling on the marker – Moquelumne.
 
Regarding - Jackson -. In 1854 Amador County was carved out of parts of El Dorado and Calaveras Counties and Jackson became the official county seat of Amador County.
 
Additional comments.
1. The Theft of the County Seat
When Calaveras County was organized the town of Double Springs was named as the county seat. This town had but one
Hangman's Tree Marker image. Click for more information.
By Syd Whittle
3. Hangman's Tree Marker
This marks the location of the "Hangman's Tree" near the site of the Colonel Collier shooting.
Click for more information.
house which served as the courthouse, saloon, hotel and general store. The people of Jackson felt that their town would make a better location for the county seat as the town was larger with the existence of a few more houses – less than a dozen. At the same time Mokelumne Hill, an even much larger town was also attemping to gain the title of county seat.

An election was held and Mokelumne Hill received the most votes. This did not sit well with the citizens of Jackson, as the votes for Mokelumne Hill numbered more than the population. A group from Jackson, headed by Charles Boynton and Theodore Mudge, paid a visit to the saloon in Double Springs and bought drinks for everyone. Colonel Collier, the Clerk of the Court, was known as “a rather pompous, portly Virginia gentleman, fond of telling good stories, and fonder still of good liquor, never refusing the opportunity for either”, was more than happy to enjoy the free liquor. While this hosted event was taking place another detachment broke into Collierís office and stole all of the county records.

A shanty had been prepared at the foot of Court Street in Jackson to house the records of Calaveras County. Judge Smith, the County Judge, was on hand to administer justice. It is said that Judge Smith was part of the conspiracy to move the county seat.

Soon afterwards an election was held to name new county officers. Joe Douglass, a candidate running against Colonel Collier, received the larger number of votes. Colonel Collier locked up the ballets in his desk, in order to hold his position until Douglass was qualified and that the official counting of the votes was certified by his signature. Judge Smith broke into Collierís office and stole the ballets, counted the returns and issued the certificates to the new office holders – Douglass being one.

This incident continued the feud between Smith and Collier which was finally ended when Judge Smith shot and killed Collier near the site of the “hanging tree” in Jackson. Judge Smith was never tried for this incident, but public indignation was so strong that he was forced to resign.
    — Submitted February 17, 2010.

 
Categories. GovernmentNotable Events
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,090 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   3. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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