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Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina

1783

 
 
The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
1. The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina Marker
Inscription.
On this site stood The City Tavern where on August 29, 1783, forty-three officers of the Continental Army residing in South Carolina met at the call of Major General William Moultrie to establish The Society of the Cincinnati in South Carolina. The society's purpose was, and is, to keep alive the principles of liberty for which its founders had fought and suffered for eight years during the American Revolution and to perpetuate these values through their descendants.

Elected as the Society's first officers in 1783 were:
Major General William Moultrie, President
Brigadier General Issac Huger, Vice President
Major Thomas Pinckney, Secretary
Captain Charles Lining, Treasurer
Lieutenant James Kennedy, Assistant Treasurer

Similar societies were formed in each of the other original thirteen states and in France. The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina is one of six state societies that have been in continuous operation since their founding.
Esto Perpetua

 
Erected by The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina.
 
Location. 32° 46.611′ N, 79° 55.753′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston
Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
2. Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina Marker
County. Marker is at the intersection of Church Street and Broad Street, on the right when traveling north on Church Street. Click for map. Marker is located on the side of the building. The current building houses the South Carolina Bank and Trust. Marker is at or near this postal address: 46 Broad Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry / Solomon's Lodge No. 1 (here, next to this marker); Shepheard's Tavern (a few steps from this marker); The Grand Lodge of Ancient Freemasons of South Carolina (a few steps from this marker); Old Bank Building (within shouting distance of this marker); William A. Giles (within shouting distance of this marker); Clark Mills Studio (within shouting distance of this marker); The Confederate Home (within shouting distance of this marker); Bible Depository (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Daniel Ravenel II House (about 300 feet away); Francis Salvador (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Society of the Cincinnati. The Society of the Cincinnati was founded at the close of the Revolutionary War by the officers of the Continental line and their French counterparts, who had served together in the struggle for American independence.
Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina Seal image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
3. Society of the Cincinnati of the State of South Carolina Seal
One of the earliest examples of the bald eagle being used as an official symbol in the United States.
(Submitted on February 14, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.) 

2. Society of the Cincinnati. The Society of the Cincinnati is a historical organization with branches in the United States and France founded in 1783 to preserve the ideals and fellowship of the American Revolutionary War officers and to pressure the government to honor pledges it had made to officers who fought for American independence. (Submitted on October 2, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. William Moultrie. William Moultrie (November 23, 1730 – September 27, 1805) was a general from South Carolina in the American Revolutionary War. (Submitted on October 2, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Isaac Huger. Isaac Huger (March 19, 1742 – October 17, 1797) was a planter and Continental Army general during the American Revolutionary War. (Submitted on October 2, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Thomas Pinckney. Thomas Pinckney (October 23, 1750 – November 2, 1828) was an early American statesman, diplomat and veteran of both the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. (Submitted on October 2, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. American Revolution in South Carolina > Capt. Charles Lining. Sketch of Captain
William Moultrie<br>November 23, 1730 – September 27, 1805 image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
4. William Moultrie
November 23, 1730 – September 27, 1805
Charles Lining's military career. (Submitted on October 2, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsNotable Places
 
Isaac Huger<br>March 19, 1742 – October 17, 1797 image. Click for full size.
United States Marshall's Service
5. Isaac Huger
March 19, 1742 – October 17, 1797
Thomas Pinckney<br>1750-1828 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, W.C. Armstrong, engraver
6. Thomas Pinckney
1750-1828
Statue of Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus<br>Cincinnati, OH image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia, photo by Rick Dikeman, 2004
7. Statue of Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus
Cincinnati, OH
Namesake of the Society as well as other location
South Carolina Bank and Trust Building image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
8. South Carolina Bank and Trust Building
South Carolina Bank and Trust Building image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
9. South Carolina Bank and Trust Building
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,412 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8, 9. submitted on , by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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