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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Butner in Granville County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Camp Butner

 
 
Camp Butner Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 10, 2010
1. Camp Butner Marker
Inscription. World war II infantry training camp; housed Axis prisoners of war. Named for N.C. native, Gen. Henry W. Butner.
 
Erected 1989 by Division of Archives and History. (Marker Number G-105.)
 
Location. 36° 8.967′ N, 78° 43.983′ W. Marker is in Butner, North Carolina, in Granville County. Marker is at the intersection of E C Street (North Carolina Route 56) and South 33rd Street, on the right when traveling south on E C Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Butner NC 27509, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. West Point Truce Line (approx. 11.3 miles away); Duke Homestead (approx. 12.3 miles away); North Carolina (approx. 13.1 miles away); a different marker also named Duke Homestead (approx. 13.1 miles away); Henry P. Cheatham (approx. 13.3 miles away); Central Orphanage of North Carolina (approx. 13.4 miles away); Royal Ice Cream Sit-In (approx. 13.7 miles away); Mary Potter Academy (approx. 13.9 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  History of Camp Butner. “Camp Butner was officially closed by the War Department on January 31, 1947. On April 26, 1947, the War Assets
Camp Butner Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 10, 2010
2. Camp Butner Marker
Administration assumed responsibility for the acreage. As the Camp was phased out, over 20,000 acres were sold back to the farmers who had original ownership. Approximately 5,000 acres were transferred to the North Carolina National Guard which maintains it for training. In addition, over 13,000 acres were transferred to the State of North Carolina in 1947. On November 3, 1947, the State of North Carolina took over the Camp and assumed the police and fire services. Also at this time, Mr. John Umstead, brother of Governor William B. Umstead, initiated a move in the North Carolina Legislature to provide better care for the mentally ill. This was the beginning of what is now known as ‘Butner,’ which quickly became the home of a number of State facilities. ” (Submitted on February 14, 2010.) 
 
Categories. War, World II
 
Building at the Former Camp Butner image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 10, 2010
3. Building at the Former Camp Butner
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 970 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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