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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Burnet in Burnet County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Longhorn Caverns

 
 
Longhorn Caverns Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, December 23, 2007
1. Longhorn Caverns Marker
Inscription. Rich in history and folklore. A young geologic formation, only a few million years old. Bones of elephant, bison, bear, deer, other animals have been found here. When white men came to area in 1840's, Indians knew the caverns; Rangers once found and rescued a kidnapped girl from Indians in "Council Room."

During Civil War (1861-1865) gunpowder was manufactured and stored here. In 1870's outlaws, including the Sam Bass gang, sometimes lived in the cavern.

Site of night club in 1920's.

Has many unique features. Was opened to public in 1932.
 
Erected 1967 by the State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 9724.)
 
Location. 30° 41.073′ N, 98° 21.062′ W. Marker is near Burnet, Texas, in Burnet County. Marker can be reached from Park Rd 4 S. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burnet TX 78611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Longhorn Cavern Administration Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Hoover's Valley Cemetery (approx. 2.2 miles away); The Tobey Community Cemetery (approx. 3.2 miles away); Fisher - Miller - Grant
Longhorn Caverns, Registered Natural Landmark Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, December 30, 2011
2. Longhorn Caverns, Registered Natural Landmark Marker
(approx. 4.7 miles away); Crownover Chapel (approx. 4.9 miles away); Antlers Hotel (approx. 5.4 miles away); Peter Kerr 1795-1861 (approx. 5.9 miles away); C.S.A. Salt Works (approx. 6.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Burnet.
 
Also see . . .
1. Longorn Caverns State Park. (Submitted on February 16, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.)
2. Battle of Plum Creek Marker. Daughters of Republic of Texas, Volume 1, state Indians were Comanches fleeing from Council House fight. Battle of Plum Creek was a major battle following Comanche attacks on Linnville and Victoria in response to the Council House fight. (Submitted on December 31, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. The Casas Reales Marker. The Casas Reales, in San Antonio, was the sight of the Council House fight. Daughter's of the Republic of Texas, Vol 1, state Indians at Longhorn Caverns were Comanches fleeing from Council House fight. (Submitted on December 31, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

4. Handbook of Texas Online. (Submitted on December 31, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
 
Additional comments.
Entrance to Longhorn Caverns image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, December 23, 2007
3. Entrance to Longhorn Caverns

1. The Insiders' Guide to San Antonio
This source provides the following description on kidnapped girl story referenced on the marker. Quote "...Comanches once kidnapped a young woman named Mariel King and brought her back to the cavern. The Indians did not realize they had been followed by three Texas Rangers. When the Indians prepared a campfire, the Rangers fired on then, grabbed Mariel King, and raced for the entrance. Meanwhile, the surviving Comanche regrouped and began their counter attack, falling upon the Rangers before they reached the cavern entrance. A desperate hand to hand battle took place, with the Rangers finally escaping with Mariel King. Ending the story with a fairy-tale flourish, King later married one of her rescuers, Logan Van Deveer (sic), and the couple made their home in Burnet..."
    — Submitted December 31, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

2. Daughters of Republic of Texas, Volume 1 (ISBN-13: 9781563112140)
This source states the rangers as being Noah Smithwick, William Magill, and Logan Vandeveer, and quotes a date of 1840, and that the Indians as being Comanches "fleeing" the Council House fight in San Antonio. The Council House fight took place in March of 1840.
    — Submitted December 31, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

 
Categories. EntertainmentNative AmericansNatural Features
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,151 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   2. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   3. submitted on , by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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