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Tampa in Hillsborough County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Oaklawn Cemetery

 
 
Oaklawn Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
1. Oaklawn Cemetery Marker
also see nearby markers
Inscription. This hallowed ground set aside as a town burial site in 1850 "for whites & slaves alike" is the resting place for many of Tampa's founding fathers, mayors, and county officers. A governor of Florida, two Supreme Court Judges, framers of all five Florida Constitutions 1839-1885, and soldiers of seven wars. Second Seminole War, Mexican War, Billy Bowlegs Indian War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I and World War II, rest here.
 
Erected by Tampa Historical Society with Contributions from its Members and Friends.
 
Location. 27° 57.258′ N, 82° 27.475′ W. Marker is in Tampa, Florida, in Hillsborough County. Marker is at the intersection of North Morgan Street and East Fortune Street, on the right on North Morgan Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Tampa FL 33602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Kennedy (a few steps from this marker); Victims of the Yellow Fever (within shouting distance of this marker); 29 Sea Captains and Mariners (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate States Soldiers and Sailors (within shouting
Oaklawn Cemetery Main Gate image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 12, 2010
2. Oaklawn Cemetery Main Gate
The cemetery is located at 606 East Harrison Street. The city sign to the left of the gate reads:
Oaklawn Cemetery
931-2168
Operated by
City of Tampa Parks Dept.
For information 931-2121
Open 8am-6pm
No Pets Allowed
No Trespassing
Security Patroled
distance of this marker); Historic Harlem Academy School #2 (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Sagamore (within shouting distance of this marker); Tampa Native Americans (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Brooke Mass Grave (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Tampa.
 
Regarding Oaklawn Cemetery. Oaklawn Cemetery was created in 1850, when Tampa was a struggling town of around 500 persons. In the minutes of the Alachua County Commissioners meeting, Oaklawn was designated as a public burying ground for “white and slave, rich and poor.”
Originally, most of the grave markers were wood (usually carved cypress), since stone for memorials necessitated an expensive combination of sail, steamship, and wagon transportation. (Tampa had no rail service until 1884.) Wood markers were destroyed by fire, rot, and storms, leaving many graves without durable markers. Additionally, the original plat of the cemetery was misplaced after the Civil War, and the locations and identities of many early interments were lost. At Oaklawn are buried many of Tampa’s pioneer families, thirteen mayors of the
Oaklawn Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 12, 2010
3. Oaklawn Cemetery Marker
Viewed from inside the cemetery, looking towards downtown north
City, one Florida Governor, two Florida Supreme Court Justices, and the framers of five State Constitutions. A portion of the cemetery was set aside for slaves and “marginal” persons (such as pirates), and public monies were designated to bury indigents. (Historic Guides and the Tampa Historical Society)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial Sites
 
Oaklawn Cemetery Marker seen along North Morgan Street, Tampa image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
4. Oaklawn Cemetery Marker seen along North Morgan Street, Tampa
Oaklawn Cemetery Map image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 12, 2010
5. Oaklawn Cemetery Map
Posted at the cemetery's gazebo, the map plots Oaklawn Cemetery, and shows the neighboring area comprising St. Louis Cemetery (Tampa's first Catholic cemetery which is operated by the Diocese of St. Petersburg). St. Louis is commonly perceived to be part of Oaklawn as both cemeteries are enclosed within the same walls, with ill-defined interior boundaries.
Oaklawn Cemetery - Henry Laurens Mitchell: image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
6. Oaklawn Cemetery - Henry Laurens Mitchell:
a promising young attorney who later served as the 15th Governor of the State of Florida from 1892 to 1896. Mitchell is the only State Governor buried at Oaklawn.
Oaklawn Cemetery - Henry Mitchell (reverse) image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 12, 2010
7. Oaklawn Cemetery - Henry Mitchell (reverse)
Prior to serving on the Florida Supreme Court and as Governor of Florida, Captain Henry L Mitchell served in Co. K of the 4th Florida Infantry, Confederate States Army (along with John T. Lesley - see below)
Oaklawn Cemetery Confederate Unknown Soldier image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
8. Oaklawn Cemetery Confederate Unknown Soldier
Oaklawn Cemetery , 29 Sea Captains and Mariners Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
9. Oaklawn Cemetery , 29 Sea Captains and Mariners Memorial
Oaklawn Cemetery , Yellow Fever Victims Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
10. Oaklawn Cemetery , Yellow Fever Victims Memorial
Oaklawn Cemetery , Confederate States Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Stone image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
11. Oaklawn Cemetery , Confederate States Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Stone
Oaklawn Cemetery , USS Sagamore Stone image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
12. Oaklawn Cemetery , USS Sagamore Stone
* See nearby markers
Oaklawn Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
13. Oaklawn Cemetery Marker
USS Sagamore shelling of the cemetery
Oaklawn Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
14. Oaklawn Cemetery Marker
Judge
Joseph B.
Lancaster
First Mayor
City of Tampa
1856

Joseph Lancaster was Tampa’s first mayor. He was also a judge, sitting on the Florida Supreme Court in 1851, and Speaker of the Florida House in 1843-47. A persistent mystery surrounds the grave of this prominent early Tampan. While local records, Masonic accounts and a headstone confirm that Lancaster was buried in Oaklawn in 1856, a memorial stone for the judge also exists in the old city cemetery in Jacksonville, Florida. Some wags have suggested that an astute politician like Judge Lancaster would have had no difficulty lying in two places at once. (Historic Guides and the Tampa Historical Society)
Oaklawn Cemetery John T. Lesley Capt. Co. K 4th Fla. Inf., CSA image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
15. Oaklawn Cemetery John T. Lesley Capt. Co. K 4th Fla. Inf., CSA
John T. Lesley Family. John T. Lesley was a pioneer cattleman, an Indian fighter, and a Captain in the Confederate Army. He formed his own volunteer company, the “Sunny South Guards,” in 1860. Later, he became a state senator. Son William T. Lesley was Sheriff and a member of the 1885 Constitutional Convention. The union of the Lesley and Brown families (John T. was married to William T. Brown’s daughter, Margaret) produced one of the most powerful local dynasties in politics, business and agriculture. Theodore Lesley, John’s son, was County Historian and an ardent preservationist of local records.(Historic Guides and the Tampa Historical Society)
Oaklawn Cemetery John T. Lesley Family. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 30, 2012
16. Oaklawn Cemetery John T. Lesley Family.
* see previous photo
Oaklawn Cemetery Mass Graves image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
17. Oaklawn Cemetery Mass Graves
Lower: 102 Fort Brooke Soldiers and Settlers
Upper: Tampa Native Americans
Oaklawn Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 30, 2012
18. Oaklawn Cemetery
Capt
James Gettis

Co B
7 Fl Inf
CSA
May 1 1816
Dec 14 1867
Oaklawn Cemetery, Capt. Gettis back side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 30, 2012
19. Oaklawn Cemetery, Capt. Gettis back side
Tampa's 2nd
Lawer - 1848

Del. Fla Sec
Conv. - 1861

Del. Const.
Conv. of Fla.
1865

Circuit Judge
1865 - 1867
Pirate Graves at Oaklawn Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 20, 2010
20. Pirate Graves at Oaklawn Cemetery
(Left)
Jose Perfino
El Indio
A Cuban Pirate
Killed 1850

(Right)
Mr. Hubbard
A Cuban Pirate
Found dead in woods
June 18, 1850
St. Louis Catholic Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 12, 2010
21. St. Louis Catholic Cemetery Marker
This post marks the boundary between Oaklawn and the Catholic cemetery, which was established in 1874. It is the only significant physical indicator or signage showing where Oaklawn ends and St. Louis begins.
Oaklawn & St. Louis Cemeteries Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, September 12, 2010
22. Oaklawn & St. Louis Cemeteries Marker
This marker separating the Oaklawn and St. Louis cemeteries was erected by Arsenio M. Sanchez and Julius J. Gordon
March 30, 1998
 
 
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