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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Peak in Newberry County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Peak

 
 
Peak Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cindy Bullard, February 16, 2010
1. Peak Marker
Inscription. This town, founded in 1853 as Peak's Station on the Greenville & Columbia Railroad, was named for railroad superintendent H.T. Peake. In 1865 Federal troops destroyed the tracks here and over the Broad River. Peak, incorporated in 1880, prospered as a railroad town and local center of farming, business, and medical care, in spite of fires in its commercial district in 1909, 1953, and 1978.
 
Erected 1999 by the Town of Peak. (Marker Number 36-15.)
 
Location. 34° 14.474′ N, 81° 19.35′ W. Marker is in Peak, South Carolina, in Newberry County. Click for map. Marker is beside a small park, behind the commercial area. Marker is in this post office area: Peak SC 29122, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. John's Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Hope Rosenwald School (approx. 3.1 miles away); Spring Hill (approx. 5.2 miles away); Pomaria (approx. 5.5 miles away); Folk-Holloway House (approx. 5.9 miles away); Lutheran Theological Southern Seminary (approx. 6.3 miles away); Old Brick Church (approx. 6.5 miles away); Bethlehem Lutheran Church (approx. 7 miles away).
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Peak Marker and Park image. Click for full size.
By Cindy Bullard, February 16, 2010
2. Peak Marker and Park
Old Building image. Click for full size.
By Cindy Bullard, February 16, 2010
3. Old Building
This building is beside an old railroad bed, probably a spur line.
Old Railroad Trestle image. Click for full size.
By Cindy Bullard, February 16, 2010
4. Old Railroad Trestle
This Trestle is on the spur line, not the tracks over the Broad River.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Bullard of Seneca, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 968 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by David Bullard of Seneca, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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