“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Johnsonville in Florence County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)

Witherspoon’s Ferry / Johnsonville

Witherspoon’s Ferry Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 20, 2010
1. Witherspoon’s Ferry Face of Marker
Inscription. Witherspoon’s Ferry. In use during the American Revolution, Witherspoon’s Ferry was the site at which Francis Marion accepted command of the Williamsburg Militia in 1780. Ownership of the ferry lands passed from Robert to John Witherspoon in 1787; in 1802 John bequeathed the land to Aimwell Presbyterian Church. The church had closed by 1820.

Johnsonville. In 1819, former South Carolina Governor David R. Williams, son-in-law of John Witherspoon, obtained these ferry lands. In 1842 William Johnson acquired the land and in 1843 a post office, named Johnsonville, was established near her.
Erected 1979 by Three Rivers Historical Society. (Marker Number 21-3.)
Location. 33° 50.217′ N, 79° 26.917′ W. Marker is near Johnsonville, South Carolina, in Florence County. Marker is on Kingsburg Highway (South Carolina Route 51) north of White Oak Drive (County Route 21-647), on the left when traveling south. Click for map. It is next to the American Legion Post. Marker is at or near this postal address: 714 Kingsburg Highway, Johnsonville SC 29555, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Witherspoon’s Ferry: Francis Marion Takes Command (about 600 feet away, measured
Johnsonville Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 20, 2010
2. Johnsonville Face of Marker
in a direct line); Marion at Port’s Ferry / Asbury at Port’s Ferry (approx. 1.6 miles away); Ebenezer United Methodist Church (approx. 4.7 miles away); Dunham’s Bluff: Control of the Rivers (approx. 6.2 miles away but has been reported missing); Snow’s Island: Den of the Swamp Fox (approx. 6.2 miles away); Britton's Neck/Britton's Ferry (approx. 6.8 miles away); Marion's Camp at Snow's Island (approx. 6.9 miles away); Hannah (approx. 8.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Johnsonville.
Also see . . .  Revolutionary War Raids & Skirmishes in 1781. “After the raid on Snow’s Island, [British Colonel] Doyle retraced his steps six or seven miles to Witherspoon’s Ferry where he camped on the north bank of Lynches River. When [American partisan Francis] Marion returned he camped at Indiantown, at which time his force had dropped down to about 70 men. Even so, on April 3, Brig. Gen. Francis Marion ordered Lt. Col. Hugh Horry to take his mounted infantry to travel to Whig’s Plantation. At the plantation,
Witherspoon’s Ferry / Johnsonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 20, 2010
3. Witherspoon’s Ferry / Johnsonville Marker
Col. William E. Doyle had some foragers there collecting food for the troops. When Horry arrived at the plantation, they engaged the British, killing 9 men and capturing 16 men. The Patriots pursued the fleeing British to Witherspoon’s ferry. There, they caught the British rear guard scuttling the ferryboat. The Patriots fired on the Loyalists. Doyle quickly formed his men along the bank of the Lynches River and delivered a volley of musketfire on the Patriots. After this firing, the British gathered up their belongings and headed towards the Pee Dee River. Doyle is said to have lost 9 killed or wounded, and 15 or 16 taken prisoner in the encounter. Either just before or after this event, Marion was joined by a reinforcement under Col. Able Kolb to assist against Doyle The latter, however, made haste to withdraw, destroyed his heavy baggage, and retired to Camden.” (Submitted on February 24, 2010.) 
Categories. War, US RevolutionaryWaterways & Vessels
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,131 times since then and 105 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement