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Kingstree in Williamsburg County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
Stephen A. Swails House
 
Stephen A. Swails House Marker (front) Photo, Click for full size
By Cindy Bullard, February 18, 2010
1. Stephen A. Swails House Marker (front)
 
Inscription.
[Front]:
Stephen Atkins Swails (1832-1900), U.S. Army officer and state senator, lived in a house on this site 1868-79. Swails, a free black from Pennsylvania, came to S.C. in 1863 as a 1st Sgt. in the 54th Massachusetts Volunteers (Colored), the first black regiment organized in the North during the Civil War. He was wounded twice and was commissioned 2nd lt. by Massachusetts Governor John Andrew in early 1864.

[Reverse]:
Swails, one of only about 100 black officers during the Civil War, was promoted to 1st lt. in 1865. Afterwards he was an agent for the Freedmen's Bureau and practiced law in Kingstree. He was a state senator 1868-78 and served three terms as president pro tem. Swails was also intendant of Kingstree 1873-77 and edited the Williamsburg Republican. He is buried in the Friendly Society Cemetery in Charleston.
 
Erected 1998 by Williamsburg Historical Society. (Marker Number 45-12.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Williamsburg County Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 33° 39.921′ N, 79° 49.446′ W. Marker is in Kingstree, South Carolina, in Williamsburg County. Marker is at the intersection of
 
Stephen A. Swails House Marker (reverse) Photo, Click for full size
By Cindy Bullard, February 18, 2010
2. Stephen A. Swails House Marker (reverse)
 
Main Street (South Carolina Route 261) and North Brooks Street, on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Kingstree SC 29556, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Albanís Episcopal Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Williamsburgh (approx. 0.4 miles away); Willamsburg County Veterans Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); Williamsburg County Confederate Monument (approx. 0.4 miles away); Captain Roger Gordon (approx. 0.4 miles away); Old Muster Ground and Courthouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); John Witherspoon (approx. 0.4 miles away); Thurgood Marshall, J.D. (approx. 0.4 miles away); Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (approx. half a mile away); Williamsburg Church (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Kingstree.
 
Also see . . .
1. Stephen Atkins Swails. Stephen Atkins Swails (23 February 1832 – 17 May 1900) was a soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Stephen Atkins Swails (1832-1900) - Find-a-Grave Memorial. Civil War figure, Senator, Mayor. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Black Civil-War Soldier Gets Overdue Honors. For more than a century, Lt. Stephen Atkins Swails has lain in an unmarked grave in Charleston, S.C., his life story largely forgotten. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Stephen Atkins Swails<br>1832–1900 Photo, Click for full size
Wikipedia, 1864
3. Stephen Atkins Swails
1832–1900
 

4. African American Historical Alliance - Lt.. Stephen Swails. Swails was born of a black father and white mother, Peter and Joanna Swails, in 1832 in Columbia, Pennsylvania. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Stephen A. Swails. Telling of a story that needs to be told. Lt. Stephen A. Swails served in S.C. Senate, 54th Massachusetts. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts was organized in March, 1863 at Camp Meigs, Readville, Massachusetts by Robert Gould Shaw, twenty-six year old member of a prominent Boston abolitionist family. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. John Albion Andrew. John Albion Andrew (May 31, 1818 – October 30, 1867) was a U.S. political figure. He served as the 25th Governor of Massachusetts between 1861 and 1866 during the tumultuous American Civil War. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands, usually referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau, was a U.S. federal government agency that aided distressed refugees and freedmen (freed slaves) in 1865-1872, during the Reconstruction era of the United States. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
John A. Andrew<br>1818-1867 Photo, Click for full size
By Brian Scott
4. John A. Andrew
1818-1867
Governor of Massachusetts 1861–1866
 

9. The Freedman's Bureau Online. The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands often referred to as the Freedmen's Bureau, was established in the War Department by an act of March 3, 1865. (Submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on February 24, 2010, by David Bullard of Seneca, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,008 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 24, 2010, by David Bullard of Seneca, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on February 9, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
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