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Wilmington in Clinton County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial

 
 
907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 18, 2009
1. 907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial Marker
Inscription.
In Memoriam
TSgt. William B. Hansford III
Sgt Ernest L. Arehart
Sgt. Richard N. Hall
Sgt. David A. Husinga
A1C Paul L. Ruschau
A1C Michael L. Wiford

9 August 1968

907 Tactical Airlift Group

Died in C-119G accident CCAFB

 
Erected by 907th Tactical Airlift Group.
 
Location. 39° 26.746′ N, 83° 48.576′ W. Marker is in Wilmington, Ohio, in Clinton County. Click for map. Memorial is near the flagpole in the chain-link fenced enclosure in Denver Williams Memorial Park, about 0.1 miles south of the park entrance off Rombach Avenue (US Route 22). Marker is in this post office area: Wilmington OH 45177, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 302nd TCW Aircraft Accident Memorial (here, next to this marker); 302 TAW C-123 Accident Memorial (here, next to this marker); 302 TAW C-119 Accident Memorial (here, next to this marker); Kenneth W. Faul (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); J. W. Denver Williams, Jr. (about 700 feet away); Wilmington War Memorial
907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 18, 2009
2. 907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial
(about 700 feet away); Indian Trails of Clinton County (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wilmington College (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Wilmington.
 
Regarding 907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial. "CCAFB" means Clinton County Air Force Base.
 
Additional comments.
1. 907 TAG C-119G Accident Details
The unfortunate accident occurred on takeoff. The C-119 developed engine trouble just as it was taking off and crashed in a field about a mile off of the end of the runway. All those killed were passengers except Sgt Richard N. Hall who was part of the crew. He was the loadmaster. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted March 7, 2010, by Ron Eveleigh of Cincinnati, Ohio.

2. 119 Down
If this is the accident I am thinking of, it occurred at Ft. Benning, Georgia in the Summer of 1968. The airplane in question belonged to my late father's squadron. It happened during summer training camp for the airborne troops. The pilot lost an engine on takeoff
907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 18, 2009
3. 907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial
At center.
and couldn't climb out at full load. He had no choice but to land straight ahead. He clipped the trees off the end of the runway and headed for the only field he thought he could possibly make. There was an earth dike around it and they didn't clear it.

The aircraft hit the dike and the entire front end from the wing forward disintegrated. The pilot's seats were thrown 125 yards out into the field on the other side of the dike. Neither the pilot or copilot sustained anything more than superficial injuries. The flight engineer/radio operator/navigator just suddenly found himself sitting outside on what remained of the flight deck and he unbuckled his seatbelt and got up and stepped off onto the dike.

The load master/crew chief was not killed, he was the only one seriously hurt, and he got burned as the wreck caught on fire and he went into the back as it was his job to get everyone out. All the casualties were National Guard troops except that the two A1C ratings were USAF along for traing, but not part of the aircrew: they were at the front of the cargo bay and I think my dad said at least three of them were sitting on the jump seats at the forward bulkhead and the cargo broke loose and telescoped into the bulkhead and killed them all.

My dad was on the board of inquiry as the airplane came from his squadron. He had to stay behind for ten days when
907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 18, 2009
4. 907 TAG C-119G Accident Memorial
At center. Looking NW.
the rest rotated back home to Ellington, AFB. None of the officers on the board could believe this had happened; that the flight crew were ok and the guys in the back who should have made it were zapped, but it did happen. The biggest single piece they found of the front of the aircraft was a triangular piece of aluminum about the size of putting both your hands together overlapped.
    — Submitted September 9, 2011, by John Kelinske of Houston, Texas.

3. C-119 Accident
The accident occurred in Wilmington, Ohio. TSgt Hansford was my uncle. The date of the accident, Aug. 9, 1968, was one day after my 20th birthday. I had two cousins who shared my Aug. 8th birthday, including one of TSgt Hansford's sons, Roy Hansford.

It was my understanding that those who died were trapped when one of the wings broke off and trapped them where they were unable to escape from the ensuing flames.
    — Submitted November 14, 2011, by Pete Haines of Toano, Virginia.

 
Categories. 20th CenturyAir & SpaceHeroesMilitary
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,037 times since then and 27 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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