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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Wilson House

 
 
Wilson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Wilson House Marker
Inscription. Built by 1872, this house was the boyhood home of Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), twenty-eighth President of the United States (1913-21). It was constructed by his parents, the Reverend Joseph Ruggles Wilson and Jessie Woodrow Wilson, when they lived in Columbia. The Reverend Wilson was a professor at Columbia Theological Seminary from 1870 to 1874 and was minister of Columbia's First Presbyterian Church from 1871 to 1873.
 
Erected 1978 by The Historic Columbia Foundation. (Marker Number 40-69.)
 
Location. 34° 0.481′ N, 81° 1.621′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is on Hampton Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Located between Barnwell and Henderson Streets. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Wilson Boyhood House (here, next to this marker); "Chesnut Cottage" (within shouting distance of this marker); Original Site of Columbia College (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Columbia Bible College (about 500 feet away); Original Site of Winthrop College
Wilson House image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
2. Wilson House
National Register of Historic Places: Wilson, Thomas Woodrow, Boyhood Home *** (added 1972 - Building - #72001222)
(about 700 feet away); Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary (approx. 0.2 miles away); Columbia Bible College, 1937-1960 / Westervelt Home, 1930 - 1937 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Hampton - Preston House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Wilson House. Built in 1872, in the then popular “Cottage Style” and bearing the theme of a modified Tuscan villa of unquestionable Andrew Jackson Downing inspiration, the Thomas Woodrow Wilson Boyhood Home is one of the best examples of Italianate “Cottage Architecture” in South Carolina. Remaining virtually as built, the home where Woodrow Wilson spent part of his boyhood today provides a glimpse into the world of the 1870s which influenced the boy who became the twenty-eighth President of the United States. The home was built by the Reverend Joseph Ruggles Wilson, professor at the Columbia Theological Seminary from 1870 to 1874, minister of the First Presbyterian Church from 1871 to 1873 and father of Thomas Woodrow Wilson. The family occupied the house until 1875 when the Wilsonís moved from South Carolina. Restored by Historic Columbia Foundation, the house
Wilson House image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, October 25, 2006
3. Wilson House
contains gaslights of the period, 1870s oak graining, and original iron mantels painted to resemble marble. The lawn, which is
surrounded by a picket fence, contains tea olives, magnolias and dogwoods planted by the Wilsonís. Listed in the National Register February 23, 1972. (South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Wilson House image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, October 25, 2006
4. Wilson House
Wilson House, rear view image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, October 25, 2006
5. Wilson House, rear view
Woodrow Wilson image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
6. Woodrow Wilson
Wilson House Marker, looking east along Hampton Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
7. Wilson House Marker, looking east along Hampton Street
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 720 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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