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Salinas in Monterey County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army
 
The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Andrew Ruppenstein, January 16, 2010
1. The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker
 
Inscription. The first Filipino Infantry Regiment was activated July 13, 1942 at the Salinas California Rodeo Grounds. The Second Filipino Infantry Regiment was activated November 22, 1942 at Fort Ord. Personnel were Filipinos living in the United States then and American officers who trained in Salinas, Camp San Luis Obispo, Hunter Liggett, Camp Roberts, Camp Cooke and Camp Beale. Departed for New Guinea April 6, 1944, and fought in Leyte and Samar during the Philippine Liberation Campaign. Units supplied Gen. Douglas MacArthur more than 3,000 officers and enlisted men for his four specialized units, the Counterintelligence Corps, Commando Battalion, Alamo Scouts and Philippine Civic Affairs. Considered by many U.S. Army historians as one of the most colorful, publicized, versatile and decorated regimental combat-size units in the Pacific Theater of operations of World War II. Personnel won more than 50,000 decorations, awards, medals, ribbons, certificates, commendations and citations. Regiment returned to the Zone of the Interior April 9, 1946 and deactivated the following day at Camp Stoneman Calif.

Dedicated during formal unveiling ceremony July 29, 1984 by the First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments Association
 
Erected 1984 by The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments Association
 
The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker - Wide View Photo, Click for full size
By Andrew Ruppenstein, January 16, 2010
2. The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker - Wide View
 
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Location. 36° 41.563′ N, 121° 39.053′ W. Marker is in Salinas, California, in Monterey County. Marker can be reached from North Main Street near Iris Drive. Click for map. The marker is located next to the parking lot that is directly south of the Salinas Sports Complex (the rodeo grounds) and north of the Sherwood Hall Community Center. The entrance to the parking lot off of North Main Street, just opposite Iris Drive. Upon entering, drive 200 feet straight, and the marker is located on a corner, just as the road turns right to go into the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Salinas CA 93906, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Eugene Sherwood (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Salinas Temporary Detention Center (about 800 feet away); Baldwin Locomotive Class S – 10 Engine 1237 (approx. one mile away); Southern Pacific Caboose # 726 (approx. one mile away); The Oldest Home in Salinas (approx. one mile away); Bataan Park (approx. 1.1 miles away); The Steinbeck House (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Sargent House (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Salinas.
 
Also see . . .  California's Filipino Infantry. The California State Military Museum's History of the First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments, by Alex S. Fabros. Provides a detailed history of the formation of the regiments, as well as the social context of discrimination (anti-miscengenation laws and professional restrictions) that Filipinos faced in California. (Submitted on January 21, 2010.) 
 
The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker - Side View Photo, Click for full size
By Andrew Ruppenstein, January 16, 2010
3. The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker - Side View
Listing the Board of Directors: Chairman, Daniel Sabado; Members: Joe Agbannawag, Ricardo Aremas, Prudencio Cordero, Eliseo Felipe, Petronia Radoc, Jimmy Rimando, Felix Rosario, Getulio Siababa; Ways-Means Chm., Aurelia Lagadon; Social Chm., Flor Polido; Picnic Chm., Benito Malto; Regt. Advisor, William P. Gale; Medical Advisor, Mariano Aguirre; Activities Advisor, Ruperto Sampayan
 

 
Additional comments.
1. First Filipino Infantry Regiment
My father, T/Sgt Severino Manolo Ilaw was in the Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion First Filipino Infantry Regiment.
Served @ Fort Ord, then overseas to New Guinea, and Leyte invasion.

We are from Batangas, and I reside in Marietta, GA.
I served at Clark Field from Dec.1946 until May ,1948 when I returned to New York City

Does anyone from that regiment remember my dad?
    — Submitted May 8, 2010, by Raoul M.iLaw of Marietta, Ga., Usa.
 
The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker - Other Side View Photo, Click for full size
By Andrew Ruppenstein, January 16, 2010
4. The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Marker - Other Side View
Listing the 1984-1986 Officers: President, Alex L. Fabros; Vice President, George Novencido; Auxiliary Pres, Josefina S. Fabros; Secretary, Annie A. Ancheta; Asst. Secretary, Avelina Gapusan; Treasurer, Johnny J. Albano; Asst. Treasurer, Dina Uminga; Auditor, Bob Uminga; Asst. Auditor, Jerry Pascua; Chaplain, Johnny D. Pacis; Sgt.-at-Arms, Stanley Pena, Johnny Batalla, Florendo Maduli
 
 
Closeup of Marker - Insignia of Filipino Battalions and Regiments Photo, Click for full size
By Andrew Ruppenstein, January 16, 2010
5. Closeup of Marker - Insignia of Filipino Battalions and Regiments
According to the US Army Institute of Heraldry, "The volcano represents the area in which the units were located. The three stars are taken from the Philippines Coat of Arms which represents the principle islands - Luzon and Mindanao, and the Visayan Islands".
 
 
The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army Photo, Click for full size
By Manny Santos, circa 1942/43
6. The First and Second Filipino Infantry Regiments U.S. Army
Lest we forget! My father, Pedro Santos is seated on the left. He was from Floridablanca, Pampanga and immigrated to the US in 1929!
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on January 21, 2010, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 5,077 times since then. Last updated on February 28, 2010, by Manny Santos of Las Vegas, Nevada. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 21, 2010, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   6. submitted on February 27, 2010, by Manny Santos of Las Vegas, Nevada. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
 
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