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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney

 
 
Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney Marker
Inscription.
Home of
Chief Justice
Roger Brooke Taney

and his wife
Anne Key
--
Erected by Frederick Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1938

 
Erected 1938 by Frederick Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 39° 24.714′ N, 77° 24.978′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on South Bentz Street (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 121 South Bentz Street, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. May 17, 1943 (approx. 0.2 miles away); 1862 Antietam Campaign (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jacob Engelbrecht (approx. 0.2 miles away); Barbara Fritchie House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Braddock, Washington, and Franklin (approx. 0.2 miles away); John Hanson (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named John Hanson (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named John Hanson (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Frederick.
 
Also see . . .
The Taney House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. The Taney House
 The Roger Brooke Taney House. The house is a museum operated by the Historical Society of Frederick County. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Roger Brooke Taney Didn't Live Here.
Notwithstanding the claims of this 1938 DAR plaque, neither the author of the Dred Scott decision nor Francis Scott Key's sister, Anne, lived in this house. The house belonged to Elizabeth Luckett who sold the house to Taney in 1815 but continued to live there. Taney may have bought the house to save the mother of his ne'er-do-well friend, Otho Luckett, from foreclosure. But there's more to this site than its association with R. B. Taney. It offers a rare glimpse into middle-class life in 19th century Maryland. Mrs. Luckett's was a small house on the outskirts of a large town, not a rural plantation. She did, however, own slaves. The old "quarters" survive attached to the back of the house.
    — Submitted August 30, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

2. Confirmation that Taney did not live here
Thank you for contacting the Historical Society of Frederick County. Yes, the plaque
Slave Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 17, 2010
3. Slave Quarters
At the Roger B. Taney House
is incorrect, but it was the belief at the time of its creation.
Taney moved to Frederick in 1801 and rented a property (no longer standing) from the McPherson family on Market Street till his departure to Baltimore in 1823. The Taney House property was purchased by Elizabeth Luckett in 1801. In 1814 she entered a mortgage agreement with Roger B. Taney and John McPherson (both lawyers). By 1815, the house went up for sale and Taney purchased the property for $3200 and bought McPherson out of mortgage for a $1. So, Taney was the landlord of the house on Bentz Street, but it was never his residence. Taney later sold the home in 1823 for $1600 to Peter Mantz. If you need or would like to see any of the primary resource evidence, please let me know. Meanwhile, if you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.
Best Regards,
---
Jennifer Winter
Museum Operations Coordinator
The Historical Society of Frederick County
24 East Church Street
Frederick, MD 21701
301-663-1188 x104
    — Submitted August 30, 2013, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.

 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Inside the Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 17, 2010
4. Inside the Quarters
Advertisement for a German Speaking, Violin Playing, Runaway Enslaved Joiner Named Jack image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, July 17, 2010
5. Advertisement for a German Speaking, Violin Playing, Runaway Enslaved Joiner Named Jack

50 Dollars Reward

Ran Away from the subscriber, living in Frederick-Town, on the 19th of May, a negro man named Jack, by trade a joiner, in the service of Mr. John Brien, at Antietam Mills. Said negro is about 25 years old of a dark complexion, and speaks the German Language. He had on when he went away, a blue coat, black Pantaloons, white Jacket, and a fur hat much worn; but as he had a variety of clothes, it is probable he will change them in order to prevent apprehension. He is about 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high well built, with large whiskers, strong voice, and a scar on his chin, like-wise one on his jaw occasioned by the extraction of a tooth: He plays very well on the Violin. Any person who will apprehend him, and bring him to the subscriber, shall receive twenty dollars if taken in this state, and the same sum if secured in any jail and notifying the owner thereof, of the above reward if taken without the state and all reasonable charges paid on delivery.
Elizabeth Luckett.

May 30.
from a display inside the slave quarters at R.B.Taney House
(Not the) Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney image. Click for full size.
By E.H. Pickering, 1936
6. (Not the) Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney
Photo courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey. The marker visible here predates the current marker and reads: In this house lived Roger Brook Taney, Chief Justice of the United States, and his wife, Anne Key Taney, sister of Francis Scott Key, author of the Star Spangled Banner. Now open as a national shrine and museum. Back of the house as before the Civil War are the slave quarters with the old wine cellar.
Detail of Marker in 1936 photo image. Click for full size.
By E.H. Pickering
7. Detail of Marker in 1936 photo

In this house lived
Roger Brook Taney
Chief Justice
of the United States
and his wife
Anne Key Taney
Sister of Francis Scott Key
author of the Star Spangled Banner
------------
Now open as a
national shrine and museum
Back of the house
as before the Civil War
are the slave quarters
with the old wine cellar
Chief Justice Taney Shrine, Frederick Md. / View of Kitchen / View of Wine Cellar image. Click for full size.
J.J. Prats Postcard Collection, circa 1935
8. Chief Justice Taney Shrine, Frederick Md. / View of Kitchen / View of Wine Cellar
This unused linen postcard was printed by “Marken & Bielfeld, Inc., Frederick, Md.” The caption on the back reads, “The Roger Brooke Taney Home and Museum. A memorial to the author of the Dred Scott Decision and his wife, Anne Key Taney, sister of Francis Scott Key, author of ‘The Star Spangled Banner’.”
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,686 times since then and 10 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on .   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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