Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oneonta in Blount County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Champion Mines

 
 
Champion Mines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 27, 2010
1. Champion Mines Marker
Inscription. John Hanby came in 1817 and found a rich seam of brown iron ore. Named Champion in 1882 when Henry DeBardeleben and James Sloss bought land and brought L&N Railroad causing county seat to be moved from Blountsville to Oneonta in 1889. Most ore was mined by Shook and Fletcher 1925-1967 from Champion & Taits Gap mines under E. N. Vandergrift, superintendent. Ore was shipped to Woodward, T. C. I. & Sloss furnaces in Birmingham and Republic in Gadsden.
 
Erected 1989 by Alabama Historical Association.
 
Location. 33° 56.337′ N, 86° 27.529′ W. Marker is in Oneonta, Alabama, in Blount County. Marker is at the intersection of 6th Street South (U.S. 231) and Champion Road, on the right on 6th Street South. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oneonta AL 35121, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Historic Oneonta L & N Railroad Depot (approx. one mile away); Blount County (approx. 1.1 miles away); Bailey School (approx. 8 miles away); Battle Royal (approx. 9.1 miles away); Exploit of Murphree Sisters (approx. 9.1 miles
Champion Mines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 27, 2010
2. Champion Mines Marker
away); Gabriel Hanby, 1786-1826 (approx. 9.3 miles away); Original Site of Pleasant Hill Methodist Church (approx. 9.3 miles away); History of Locust Fork (approx. 9.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Oneonta.
 
Also see . . .
1. Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark's Website. (Submitted on March 8, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
2. Ruffner Red Ore Mine. Entry on the website for Historic American Building Surveys, Engineering Records, Landscape Surveys. (Submitted on May 27, 2010.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNatural FeaturesNotable Places
 
Champion Mines Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 27, 2010
3. Champion Mines Marker
Downtown Altoona, Alabama image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 27, 2010
4. Downtown Altoona, Alabama
Founded in 1903, Altoona started as a mining town located mid-ways on the L&N railroad between Oneonta and Gadsden, Alabama.
Portal to Ruffner Mountain Drift Mine #3. Birmingham, Alabama. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 20, 2008
5. Portal to Ruffner Mountain Drift Mine #3. Birmingham, Alabama.
Like the Champion and Taits Gap mines, other mines such as this drift mine in nearby Birnmingham, sought to profit from the area's rich mineral deposits. While the Ruffner Mountain Mines were underground, or drift, mines, the Taits Gap ore mines were open pit surface mines.
Ruffner Mountain Mine #2 Ore Crusher. Birmingham, Alabama. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, April 2, 2008
6. Ruffner Mountain Mine #2 Ore Crusher. Birmingham, Alabama.
Once the iron ore was brought up out of the mine, the ore was then loaded into a ore crusher similar to this one. The ore crusher was used to crush the larger ore rocks into a smaller manageable size for transportation. As the ore was been crushed the smaller ore would be dispensed into a waiting hopper train car below the crusher.
Old Abandon Railroad Trestle Near Altoona, Alabama image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 27, 2010
7. Old Abandon Railroad Trestle Near Altoona, Alabama
Over the years trains loaded with iron ore passed over this trestle on the way from the mines to the furnaces.
Sloss Furnaces Historic Landmark image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 12, 2010
8. Sloss Furnaces Historic Landmark
Here at Sloss, the raw iron ore is brought in from the mines by train. The ore is then loaded into the furnace along with limestone and coke to be smelted into iron. After being heated at high temperatures the bottom of the furnace is taped and the molten iron flows out into channels of molds. The molds form ingots called pig iron. The pig iron is then sold and shipped to other factories to be remelted into steel products. Sloss Furnaces is the only remaining blast furnaces still standing in Birmingham, Alabama.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 3,085 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement