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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Abraham Lincoln

 
 
Abraham Lincoln Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., June 12, 2008
1. Abraham Lincoln Marker
Inscription.

Abraham Lincoln
died in this house
April 15, 1865 at 7:22 a.m.
Purchased by
the United States
in 1896.

 
Erected 1928 by Citizens’ Committee.
 
Location. 38° 53.798′ N, 77° 1.573′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 10th Street, NW and E Street, NW, on the right when traveling south on 10th Street, NW. Click for map. The house is a component of and directly across the street from Ford's Theatre, National Historic Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 516 10th Street, NW, Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Christian Index (within shouting distance of this marker); Woodies Comes to F Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Wilkes Booth's Escape (about 400 feet away); John J. Donovan, Jr. (about 500 feet away); St. Patrick's Parish (about 600 feet away); Pennsylvania Avenue (about 600 feet away); The Old Carroll Hall (about 600 feet away); The Restoration of 800 F Street (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Downtown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Abraham Lincoln Assassination.
House Where Lincoln Died Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 18, 2008
2. House Where Lincoln Died Marker
(Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Ford's Theatre. (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Dr. Anderson Ruffin Abbott - African American physician. (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
4. Ford's Theater National Historic Site. National Park Service site. (Submitted on March 22, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

5. Lincoln Assassination. A "YouTube" compilation about the Abraham Lincoln Assassination - with old photos. (Submitted on February 11, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 

6. Inside the House Lincoln Died In::. A "YouTube" quick tour of the house's interior, including the bedroom in which Lincoln died. (Submitted on February 11, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Additional keywords. Mary Todd Lincoln; Edward M. Stanton; Dr. Charles Leale; Dr. Anderson Ruffin Abbott; Henry Safford; Clara Harris; Henry Rathbone; William Petersen; Ford's Theater; Ford's Theatre.
 
Categories. LandmarksNotable BuildingsNotable EventsPoliticsWar, US Civil
 
House Where Lincoln Died Marker image. Click for full size.
By Pat Filippone, August 3, 2011
3. House Where Lincoln Died Marker
The Petersen House - Room Where Lincoln Died image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 4, 2015
4. The Petersen House - Room Where Lincoln Died
In this room, at 7:22 A.M. on April 15, 1865, an unconscious Abraham Lincoln breathed his last. Mr. Lincoln was therefore unable to witness the nation reunite after its greatest trial.

"Now he belongs to the ages."
According to John Hay, one of the President's personal secretaries, these profound words were uttered by Edward Stanton at the time of Lincoln's death.

Captions:
Of the many depictions of the death scene, this drawing is the most accurate.

Photo taken April 15, 1865
The original bed is on exhibit in the Chicago American History Museum.
The Petersen House image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, March 18, 2008
5. The Petersen House
William A. Petersen was a tailor whose shop was on Pennsylvania Avenue. He and his wife Anna owned this house, constructed in 1849. They let out rooms to transients, including performers at Ford's Theater. One of these, John Wilkes Booth, may once have boarded in the room where Lincoln died.
Ford's Theater image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 9, 2009
6. Ford's Theater
scene of Lincoln's murder, directly across 10th street from the Petersen House.
Parlor of the Petersen house image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 4, 2015
7. Parlor of the Petersen house
The marker on the table reads, "Between visits to her husband's bedside, Mary Lincoln waited in this parlor with her son Robert and friends of the Lincoln family."
The Petersen House additional bedroom image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 4, 2015
8. The Petersen House additional bedroom
The marker on the table reads, "In this bedroom, Secretary of War Stanton held several cabinet meetings, interviewed witnesses and ordered the pursuit of the assassins."
Abraham Lincoln image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
9. Abraham Lincoln
This 1887 portrait of Abraham Lincoln by George P. A. Healy hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“Today Abraham Lincoln is universally regarded as one of our greatest presidents. But from the start of his administration, Lincoln, guiding the nation in a time of civil war, was beset with criticism from all sides. Some charged him with moral cowardice for initially insisting that an end to slavery was not one of his wartime goals; others accused him of overstepping his constitutional powers; still others blamed him for military reverses in the field. But as Union forces moved toward victory, Lincoln's eloquent articulation of the nation's ideals and his eventual call for an end to slavery gradually invested him with grandeur. following his assassination in 1865, that grandeur beca.me virtually unassailable.

The original version of this portrait was a template for artist George P. A. Healy's large painting The Peacemakers, depicting Lincoln in consultation with three of his main military advisers at the end of the Civil War. But Healy recognized that this made a fine portrait in its own right and eventually made three replicas, including this one.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,319 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by Pat Filippone of Stockton, California.   4. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   9. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on November 20, 2016.
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