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Near Goldsboro in Wayne County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Goldsborough Bridge

December 17, 1862

 
 
Battle of Goldsborough Bridge Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
1. Battle of Goldsborough Bridge Monument
Inscription. Nearly 15,000 men clashed on these fields December 17, 1862. At stake was the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad bridge which spanned the Neuse River here. Confederate troops, outnumbered five to one, fought bravely to defend the bridge, a vital link in the Confederate chain of supply between the deep South, the port at Wilmington and Northern Virginia. Union troops, on a raid from occupied New Berne and in support of the simultaneous Union offensive at Fredericksburg, Virginia, attacked from the east side of the Railroad. After a fight lasting three hours Union forces succeeded in pushing the Confederates back and then destroyed the bridge by flames and artillery fire.

Late that afternoon, additional Confederate troops arrived to support a counterattack that was in progress against the Union rear guard as it prepared to leave the field. Two North Carolina regiments plus a battalion struck nearby a mile to the south, while two more regiments crossed this field and attacked the Union force across the railroad tracks. The North Carolinians that crossed here were turned back after sustaining heavy losses caused by massed Union artillery and infantry fire.

As the sun set the firing ceased, the Battle of Goldsborough Bridge was over at a cost of nearly 250 casualties. Units present or engaged that day were from North Carolina,
Battle of Goldsborough Bridge Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
2. Battle of Goldsborough Bridge Monument
South Carolina, Mississippi, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island. A list of those units present at the battle is inscribed hereon.
 
Erected by the Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield Association, the Robert E. Lee Confederate Heritage Association, Matthews, N.C., The First North Carolina Battalion, the Stonewall Jackson Chapter, United Daughters of the Confederacy, and many friends in the North Carolina Civil War history community.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 35° 20.334′ N, 78° 1.698′ W. Marker is near Goldsboro, North Carolina, in Wayne County. Marker is on Old Mt. Olive Highway south of U.S. 117, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Goldsboro NC 27530, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Goldsboro Bridge (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate Counterattack (about 700 feet away); Attack of the 17th Massachusetts (approx. 0.2 miles away); Union Assault on the Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away); Waynesborough
Battle of Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield and Monument image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
3. Battle of Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield and Monument
(approx. 2.6 miles away); General Baptist State Convention (approx. 3.2 miles away); Gertrude Weil (approx. 3.4 miles away); First Pentecostal Holiness Church Congregation (approx. 3.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Goldsboro.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. These markers are of the four stops on the walking tour of the battlefield.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Map of Battlefield Walking Tour image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
4. Map of Battlefield Walking Tour
This map is at in information kiosk at the parking area. Stop 1 is the Civil War Trails Marker at the parking area where the trail begins. This monument is not shown on this map but it is between Stop 1 and the barn.
Information Kiosk at Start of Walking Tour image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
5. Information Kiosk at Start of Walking Tour
“Welcome to Goldsborough Bridge Battlefield, scene of the December 17, 1862 Battle of Goldsborough Bridge. Please obey all posted regulations and enjoy your visit. For more information visit www.goldsboroughbridge.com”
The Union Advance, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
6. The Union Advance, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
One of the maps on the information kiosk.
Union Assault on Bridge, 2 p.m. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
7. Union Assault on Bridge, 2 p.m.
One of the maps on the information kiosk.
Confederate Counterattack, 4:30 p.m. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
8. Confederate Counterattack, 4:30 p.m.
One of the maps on the information kiosk.
Counterattack Repulsed, 5:30 p.m. image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
9. Counterattack Repulsed, 5:30 p.m.
One of the maps on the information kiosk.
The Barn In Field Beyond the Brook image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
10. The Barn In Field Beyond the Brook
Trees that grow along a small brook shield the barn from view. A footbridge has been built to allow access to the field where the barn is located.
Replica of Confederate Camp image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 27, 2010
11. Replica of Confederate Camp
The railroad line runs left to right behind this camp. It is in the small field where the barn is located, on the west side of the railroad.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,285 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo and transcription of text on back of monument. • Can you help?
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