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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary

 
 
Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary Marker
Inscription. Founded 1828 by Presbyterian Synod of South Carolina and Georgia. Located here 1831. Moved to Decatur, Georgia 1925. Woodrow Wilson's father and uncle were among faculty members. Central building, erected 1823, was designed by Robert Mills as home for Ainsley Hall (1783-1823), Columbia merchant.
 
Erected 1938 by The Columbia Sesquicentennial Commission of 1936. (Marker Number 40-6.)
 
Location. 34° 0.612′ N, 81° 1.755′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is on Blanding Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located between Pickens Street and Henderson Street. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Columbia Bible College, 1937-1960 / Westervelt Home, 1930 - 1937 (a few steps from this marker); Hampton - Preston House (a few steps from this marker); Original Site of Winthrop College (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Church of the Good Shepard (about 600 feet away); Site of Columbia Male Academy (about 600 feet away); Colonel Thomas Taylor
Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary Marker, looking east along Blanding Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
2. Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary Marker, looking east along Blanding Street
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Wilson House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wilson Boyhood House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary. A Brief History of the Seminary
From the time of its founding in Lexington, Georgia, in 1828, Columbia has been committed to training persons for leadership in the church of Jesus Christ. Throughout its history, Columbia has nurtured, and has been nurtured by, the Presbyterian Church in the South; this connection continues to be a cherished tradition. While Columbia now enjoys an outstanding national and international reputation, it also faithfully upholds its historic covenants with the Synods of Living Waters and South Atlantic.

In 1830, Columbia, South Carolina, became the first permanent location of the seminary. The school became popularly known as Columbia Theological Seminary, and the name was formally accepted in 1925.

The decade of the 1920's saw a shift in population throughout the Southeast. Atlanta was becoming a commercial and industrial center and growing rapidly in its cultural and educational opportunities. Between 1925 and 1930, President Richard T. Gillespie
Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary current central building, houses a museum image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
3. Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary current central building, houses a museum
provided leadership that led to the development of the present facilities on a fifty-seven-acre tract in Decatur, Georgia.

Because the early years in Decatur were difficult, the future of the institution became uncertain. Columbia, however, experienced substantial growth under the leadership of Dr. J. McDowell Richards, who was elected president in 1932 and led the seminary for almost four decades. Following Dr. Richards' retirement in 1971, Dr. C. Benton Kline served five years as Columbia's president. In January 1976, Dr. J. Davison Philips assumed the presidency; he retired eleven years later. Dr. Douglas W. Oldenburg became the seminary's seventh president in January 1987. In August 2000, Dr. Laura S. Mendenhall began her service as Columbia's eighth president.She served nine years and was succeeded on July 1, 2009, by Dr. Stephen A. Hayner, who had been a member of the faculty since 2003.
(Columbia Theological Seminary)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.EducationNotable Buildings
 
Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary Marker, looking west along Blanding Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
4. Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary Marker, looking west along Blanding Street
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 611 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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