Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Wilmington in New Hanover County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

St. Mark’s Episcopal Church

Emerson and Fehmer, Boston, Architects; Alfred Howe, Builder

 

—1871–1875 —

 
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 23, 2010
1. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Marker
Inscription. Gothic Revival style church built for congregation organized in 1869. The cornerstone was laid March 23, 1871 and the edifice completed under the leadership of the Rev. Charles O. Brady. Dedicated on March 23, 1871, it was the first Episcopal church in North Carolina consecrated by Bishop Atkinson for colored people.
 
Erected by Historic Wilmington Foundation, Inc.
 
Location. 34° 14.35′ N, 77° 56.533′ W. Marker is in Wilmington, North Carolina, in New Hanover County. Marker is at the intersection of North 6th Street and Grace Street, on the right when traveling north on North 6th Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wilmington NC 28401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William G. Craig House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Powell - Yopp House (about 600 feet away); Grace Methodist Church (about 800 feet away); St. Mark’s (approx. ¼ mile away); James F. Shober (approx. ¼ mile away); Wilmington Light Infantry (approx. ¼ mile away); Thomas F. Price (approx. ¼ mile away); John A. Winslow (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Wilmington.
 
Regarding St. Mark’s Episcopal Church. The St.
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Entrance image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 23, 2010
2. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Entrance
Marker is on the left of the main entrance doors on 6th Street.
Paul’s Espiscopal Church’s website (which also has a historical marker) says, “Even during the Civil War [St. Paul’s] was one of the first integrated congregations and had ‘free’ pews rather than the then customary practice of having to pay for designated seating in family pews. In 1869 following the Civil War St. Paul’s helped found still functioning St. Mark’s Church, the first Black Episcopal Church in all of North Carolina.”
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. This is the official North Carolina historical marker on 3rd Street.
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.
 
St. Mark’s Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, February 23, 2010
3. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 724 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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