Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Ordinance of Secession

( First Baptist Church )

 
 
Ordinance of Secession Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Ordinance of Secession Marker
On February 17, 1865, during the Civil War, much of Columbia was destroyed by fire while being occupied by Union troops under the command of General William Tecumseh Sherman. According to legend, Columbia's First Baptist Church barely missed being torched by Sherman's troops. The soldiers marched up to the church and asked the groundskeeper if he could direct them to the church where the declaration of secession was signed. The loyal groundskeeper directed the men to the nearby Washington Street United Methodist church; thus, the historic landmark was saved from destruction by Union soldiers.
Inscription.
The Convention
of the
people of South Carolina
which adapted an
Ordinance Of Secession
at Charleston,
December 20, 1860
first met in this church
at 12 o'clock M.[sic]
December 17, 1860
and organized.
It adjourned at 10 o' clock P.M.
to meet in Charleston
at 4 o'clock P.M.
December 18, 1860.
——
Tablet placed by
South Carolina Division
U.D.C.
1928

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 34° 0.344′ N, 81° 1.994′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is on Hampton Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located between North Sumter Street and Marion Street at The First Baptist Church. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Baptist Church (a few steps from this marker); Site of Gibbes House (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Columbia Female Academy (about 500 feet away, measured in a
Markers at the First Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 9, 2013
2. Markers at the First Baptist Church
Both the Ordinance of Secession and National Historic Landmark markers can be seen in this photo.
direct line); Bethel A.M.E. Church (about 500 feet away); Washington Street Methodist Church (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Washington Street Methodist Church (about 500 feet away); Site of Columbia High School (about 500 feet away); Taylor Street (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Ordinance of Secession. Congregation organized 1809. Original church, built 1811 on Sumter Street corner, was burned Feb. 17, 1865 by Union troops who mistook it for the present church, built 1859, where the Secession Convention had met Dec. 17, 1860. Because of reported smallpox in Columbia, the convention adjourned to Charleston.
[The Columbia Sesquicentennial Commission of 1936]

National Register of Historic Places:
First Baptist Church *** (added 1971 - - #71000800)
1306 Hampton St. , Columbia
♦ Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Event
♦ Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown
♦ Architectural Style: Greek Revival
♦ Area of Significance: Politics/Government, Architecture
at First Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
3. at First Baptist Church
First Baptist Church
Has Been Designated A
National Historic Landmark
This Site Possesses National Significance
In Commemorating The History Of The
United States Of America
1974
National Park Service
United States Department Of The Interior

♦ Period of Significance: 1850-1874
♦ Owner: Private
♦ Historic Function: Religion
♦ Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure
♦ Current Function: Religion
♦ Current Sub-function: Religious Structure

The First Baptist Church was the scene where the first southern state convention declared its separation from the United States of America. Delegates assembled here on December 17, 1860 and unanimously declared their intent that the State of South Carolina should secede from the Union. This act of separation, coming from a state of leading political prominence, carried an immediate momentum throughout the Gulf States and Georgia, inducing them to declare their own separation. Although the convention met for only one day at Columbia and signed the State’s Ordinance of Secession only after reassembling in Charleston, the intent of the State’s political leaders was clearly and publicly declared at First Baptist. Erected in 1859, the church building features a Roman Tuscan portico and Tuscan pilasters down the sides, all rendered in molded brick. Alterations to the building occurred in 1941 and 1949. Listed in the National Register January 25, 1971; Designated a National Historic Landmark November 7, 1973.( South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
 
Related marker.
Ordinance of Secession Marker at left of doorway image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives and History
4. Ordinance of Secession Marker at left of doorway
National Register of Historic Places: First Baptist Church *** ( Building - #71000800)
Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship,see marker shown.
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PlacesPolitics
 
First Baptist Church , Columbia image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
5. First Baptist Church , Columbia
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 850 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement