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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
King of Prussia in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Village of Valley Forge

Ordinary Place, Extraordinary History

 

—Valley Forge National Historical Park —

 
The Village of Valley Forge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
1. The Village of Valley Forge Marker
Inscription. An iron forge was established in this remote place in the early 1700s, as there was ample water power from Valley Creek, limestone for processing iron ore, and timber to make charcoal to fuel the furnaces. Soon, dams and mill races, charcoal houses, a saw mill, grist mill, company store, and tenement houses grew up around the forge, forming the nucleus of an iron village. Eventually, the place was named for the forge it depended on: Valley Forge.

“Valley Forge is a manufacturing place, and there is a constant hum of machinery from the paper, flour and woolen mills. The neat little houses of the factory hands are gay with flowers and vines, while the handsome residence of the mill-owner towers castle-like above them. Past all these dwellings, at the end of the street, stands the old-fashioned stone edifice hallowed by Washington’s presence.”
Harper’s New Monthly Magazine


Before the British raid and American occupation, this small village was typical of isolated, rural villages that developed around readily available natural resources. In a region known for iron making, tiny Valley Forge was not a highly important producer, however.

Valley Forge recovered from the devastation of the encampment and grew into a busy manufacturing community. Wharves at the foot of Valley Creek
Marker in Valley Forge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
2. Marker in Valley Forge
The Valley Forge railroad station can be seen in the background of this photo.
enabled loading of products onto the new canal. A railroad built in the 1840s provided even faster transportation to Philadelphia and beyond. But as industry moved to the cities in the late 19th century, the village declined. After Pennsylvania established a park here in 1893, most buildings that post-dated the encampment were demolished, creating a park landscape that while beautiful, obscures many layers of history.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 40° 6.065′ N, 75° 27.632′ W. Marker is in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Valley Forge Road (Pennsylvania Route 23), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is on the tour road in Valley Forge National Historical Park at stop 5, Washington's Headquartes complex. Marker is in this post office area: King of Prussia PA 19406, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. American Icon (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters Complex (within shouting distance of this marker); Valley Creek (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Commander in Chief’s Guards (about 300 feet away); Washington’s Headquarters
Marker in the Valley Forge Headquarters Complex image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
3. Marker in the Valley Forge Headquarters Complex
The Isaac Potts House, which served as Washington's Headquarters during the 1777-78 winter encampment, is visible behind the marker.
(about 400 feet away); Did You Know? (about 500 feet away); Remembering Valley Forge (about 500 feet away); War Comes to Valley Forge (about 500 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in King of Prussia.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker features a picture of the village of Valley Forge on the bank of the Schuylkill River. The bottom left of the marker contains a map of Valley Forge in 1777, indicating the locations of the forge, saw mill, grist mill, Washington’s Headquarters and other structures in the area. Also present is a photo of Valley Forge before the park was established.
 
Also see . . .  Valley Forge National Historical Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on March 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWar, US Revolutionary
 
Soldier Huts in Valley Forge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
4. Soldier Huts in Valley Forge
During the encampment of 1777-78, huts in this area were occupied by Washington's Life Guards. This photo was taken from near the marker.
Valley Forge Map Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
5. Valley Forge Map Marker
The map from the marker shows some of the structures present at the village of Valley Forge in 1777.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,600 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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