Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Warren in Litchfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Warren

 
 
Warren Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 18, 2010
1. Warren Marker
front
Inscription.
[ front ]
Warren
This area was settled in 1737 as part of the Town of Kent. A separate ecclesiastical society called the Society of East Greenwich, established in 1750, led to the founding of a church in 1756 and a separate town in 1786. It was named in honor of General Joseph Warren, hero of the Revolutionary War, who was slain in the battle of Bunker Hill.
In the first century and a half of its life, Warren not only sent forty-three of its men into that war but later, even though engaged mainly in farming, the Town became known as an educational center. Five private schools and academies produced fifteen ministers and educators. Among them were Charles G. Finney, revivalist and president of Oberlin College 1851-1866, and Julian M. Sturtevant, minister and president of Illinois College 1844-1876.
During a half century commencing in 1772, more than 2837 Warren emigrants took part in settling new territories to the north and west.
[ back ]
The population of the town had increased to approximately 1100 by the year 1810 but decreased to a low of 303 in 1930 with the decline of agriculture and the local iron industry. Subsequent regrowth to 990 by 1979 was based on residential development and recreational features including Lake Waramaug, several inns, and a state park and forest.
Warren Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 18, 2010
2. Warren Marker
back

In 1963 Warren resident Eric Sloane, well-known American artist and author, revived countrywide the custom of celebrating our nation's independence by the simultaneous ringing of bells on July 4th. The focal point of the revival was the bell in the steeple of the Warren Congregational Church.
The old one-room brick schoolhouse, built in 1784, was in continuous use for 140 years. In 1968 it was presented to the Town by Frank Reinhold. The Brick School and the Warren Academy have been restored and furnished with authentic articles of an earlier time, and are open by appointment for public visitation.
Erected by the Town of Warren
the Warren Historical Society
and the Connecticut Historical Commission
1980
 
Erected 1980 by the Town of Warren, the Warren Historical Society, the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 44.613′ N, 73° 20.923′ W. Marker is in Warren, Connecticut, in Litchfield County. Marker is on Sackett Hill Road 0.1 miles south of Kent Road (Connecticut Route 341), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located across the street from Warren Town Hall. Marker is in this post office area: Cornwall Bridge CT 06754, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured
Warren Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, March 18, 2010
3. Warren Marker
as the crow flies. Warren Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Camp Macedonia Company 1191 (approx. 4.2 miles away); Impressionism in Connecticut (approx. 4.2 miles away); A Memorial To The Soldiers Who Served (approx. 4.8 miles away); Seven Hearths (approx. 5.5 miles away); Kent (approx. 5.5 miles away); Dedicated To All Veterans (approx. 5.8 miles away); Francis L. Sheane Memorial (approx. 5.8 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Warren, CT History. (Submitted on March 27, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Warren, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on March 27, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 732 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement