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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Decatur in DeKalb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Beacon Community

 
 
The Beacon Community Marker -- Side 1 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 20, 2010
1. The Beacon Community Marker -- Side 1
Inscription.
Side 1:
The Beacon Community was the center of Decaturís African American community until its demolition by the Urban Renewal programs of the mid-1960s. Bounded by N. McDonough Street on the east, W. Trinity Place on the north, Water Street on the west and Howard Avenue to the south, the area included a tight-knit residential community, schools and churches in addition to numerous African -American owned businesses. Atlanta Avenue once connected Trinity Place West (formerly Herring Street) and Howard Avenue and was the center of the African American business district. Tyler Funeral Home is the only remaining business.
The buildings on this site once housed Beacon Elementary and Trinity High School. They served African-American children until 1967 when the integration of the Decatur School System was completed. These schools replaced the Herring Street School that served the community from 1913 to 1956.

Side 2:
The Allen Wilson Terrace Public Housing Project constructed in 1941, was named for the first African-American School principal in Decatur. These school buildings, Lilly Hill Baptist Church, the former Trinity Presbyterian Church on Robin Street and the Allen Wilson Terrance project are the only remaining buildings dating to the early years of this neighborhood.
The
The Beacon Community Marker - Side 2 image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 20, 2010
2. The Beacon Community Marker - Side 2
Beacon Community was home to Henry Oliver, a business owner and resident who was honored in 1902 with a local street named for him. In 1983, the street name was changed to Commerce Drive and his name was given to a meeting room in the new Decatur Conference Center. It was also home to Deacon J.H. Ebster for Ebster park was named; Federal Court Judge Clarence Cooper and Elizabeth Wilson, Decaturís first African-American city commissioner and mayor.
 
Erected 1998 by City of Decatur, Georgia.
 
Location. 33° 46.4′ N, 84° 18.033′ W. Marker is in Decatur, Georgia, in DeKalb County. Marker is on West Trinity Place just west of Electric Avenue, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. The buildings today house Decatur's Beacon Hill Arts Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 410 West Trinity Place, Decatur GA 30030, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Houston Mill Millstone (approx. ľ mile away); Mary Gay House (approx. ľ mile away); Steatite Boulder (approx. 0.3 miles away); Garrardís Cavalry Raid (approx. 0.3 miles away); DeKalb County (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Stoneman Raid
The Beacon Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 20, 2010
3. The Beacon Community Marker
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Wheelerís Cav. at Decatur (approx. 0.3 miles away); Battle of Decatur (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Decatur.
 
Categories. 20th CenturyAfrican AmericansChurches, Etc.EducationNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
The Beacon Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 20, 2010
4. The Beacon Community Marker
The Beacon Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 20, 2010
5. The Beacon Community Marker
Looking west on West Trinity Place (toward the Mary Gay House and the Swanton House)
The Beacon Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, March 20, 2010
6. The Beacon Community Marker
Looking east on West Trinity Place toward downtown Decatur
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 760 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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