Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

History of the Battery Wall

 
 
History of the Battery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
1. History of the Battery Marker
Inscription. This map, dated 1695, shows a wall with batteries built to the south and west of Fort George, located at the tip of Manhattan. It was likely constructed of wood and stone. Additional works were added throughout the early to mid-18th century.

The final and strongest outwork is thought to have been constructed in 1766 or 1767. Called the “Grand Battery”, it was built of stone and accommodated one hundred cannon. It was from this battery that Alexander Hamilton and Captain John Lamb removed eleven artillery pieces at the beginning of the American Revolution in 1775.

The Grand Battery was the target of naval gunfire from the British warships HMS Phoenix and HMS Rose as they sailed up the Hudson River on July 12, 1776. Following the seizure of New York in September, 1776, Fort George and the Battery again became the headquarters of the British Army in New York. In 1790, following the American Revolution, the City of New York demolished Fort George and leveled the Grand Battery to use the materials to fill in the pier line along the shore.
 
Erected by Castle Clinton National Monument.
 
Location. 40° 42.22′ N, 74° 1.021′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker can be reached
Marker in Castle Clinton image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
2. Marker in Castle Clinton
from State Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located inside Castle Clinton National Monument in Battery Park. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battery Wall Discovery (here, next to this marker); The Lives of Castle Clinton: (here, next to this marker); Norwegian Maritime Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Emma Lazarus (within shouting distance of this marker); Manning Castle Clintonís 28 guns (within shouting distance of this marker); New York Korean War Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Castle Clinton National Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Castle Clinton (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. Two maps of the southern end of Manhattan Island appear on the marker. One depicts New York in 1695, while the other is a detail from Ratzerís map surveyed in 1767 and published in 1776.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. These markers are in the "Walls within Walls" exhibit in Castle Clinton National Monument.
 
Also see . . .  Castle Clinton National Monument – History & Culture
Marker in Battery Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
3. Marker in Battery Park
This is one in a series of markers in the "Walls within Walls" exhibit in Castle Clinton.
. National Park Service website. (Submitted on June 27, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Battery Wall image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
4. Battery Wall
This is an actual section of a colonial era wall that was excavated at this site in 2006. It is located right in front of tghe marker.
Cannon at Castle Clinton image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, June 24, 2009
5. Cannon at Castle Clinton
Castle Clinton protected New York City with artillery such as this cannon. The Castle was manned by 28 guns of this type.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 945 times since then and 15 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement