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Nelson Hill in Berkeley County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Gen. William Moultrie

1730-1805

 
 
Gen. William Moultrie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Gen. William Moultrie Marker
Sculptured by W. Gowan
Inscription. Commander of Fort Sullivan and the S.C. 2nd Regiment Jun. 17, 1775 to Sept. 16, 1776. Governor of South Carolina 1785-1787 and 1792-1794. Defeated the British ships in 1776 in the invasion of the Charleston Harbor. The fort's name was later changed to Fort Moultrie in honor of his victory and courage.
 
Location. 33° 20.978′ N, 80° 6.963′ W. Marker is in Nelson Hill, South Carolina, in Berkeley County. Marker is on Black's Camp Road near lake front, west shore of Lake Moultrie, in the median. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cross SC 29436, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Barnet's Tavern (approx. 1.6 miles away); Cherokee Path (approx. 1.6 miles away); Cross Post Office (approx. 2.5 miles away); Moss Grove (approx. 3.2 miles away); Friendship Methodist Church (approx. 4.5 miles away); Village of Eadytown (approx. 5.8 miles away); Thomas Sumter's Store (approx. 6.4 miles away); Village of Pineville (approx. 7.3 miles away).
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. See each marker shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Patriot Resource: William Moultrie.
Gen. William Moultrie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2010
2. Gen. William Moultrie Marker
When word of Moultrie's stout defense of Charleston reached the other colonies, it gave the rebels new hope in their cause. (Submitted on April 3, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. US History Encyclopedia: Defense of Charleston Harbor. (Submitted on April 3, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
3. Battle of Fort Sullivan background. Then intelligence was received that the fortifications at Fort Sullivan in Charleston Bay were incomplete and vulnerable. (Submitted on April 3, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. Siege of Charleston. British Lt.General Henry Clinton set out to cut off Charleston and Maj. General Benjamin Lincoln from reinforcement and silence its lines of communication. (Submitted on April 3, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Gen. William Moultrie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2010
3. Gen. William Moultrie Marker
Gen. William Moultrie image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2010
4. Gen. William Moultrie
Gen. William Moultrie Marker, west shore of Lake Moultrie,at Black's Camp Road image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 30, 2010
5. Gen. William Moultrie Marker, west shore of Lake Moultrie,at Black's Camp Road
William Moultrie image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
6. William Moultrie
This 1782 portrait of William Moultrie by Charles Willson Peale hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“In June 1776, as eight British warships stood poised to put a quick end to the rebellion in the South, William Moultrie, a planter with some experience as a militia captain, was in charge of the hastily built fort on Sullivan's Island in Charles Town harbor. The soft palmetto logs of the fort successfully absorbed bombardment from one hundred guns, whereas Moultrie's men discharged their twenty-five guns with a deliberation that demolished ship rigging and slaughtered enemy sailors. After eleven and a half hours, the British slipped away, giving South Carolina a three-year respite from war.

In the background of this portrait showing Moultrie, risen to a general in the Continental army can be glimpsed the famous fort, renamed in Moultrie's honor.” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 782 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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