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The National Mall in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

 
 
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 22, 2010
1. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker
Inscription.
“Although a soldier by profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war,
and I have never advocated it, except as a means of peace,”
General Ulysses S. Grant.

Hiram Ulysses Grant, mistakenly listed as Ulysses Simpson Grant on United States Military Academy cadet rosters, ascended from Midwestern obscurity to become the Union’s military savior and, later, the 18th President of the United States. U.S. Grant’s requirement for “unconditional surrender” in American Civil War battles and sieges helped define his adopted initials.

After President Abraham Lincoln promoted him to lieutenant general, Grant designed the comprehensive strategy that doomed Confederacy and forced Gen. Robert E. Lee’s April 9, 1865, surrender at Appomattox, Virginia. Grant issued generous surrender terms and worked with Lee to decide the fate of this nation, not merely at that hour, but for future generations.

[Caption describing background painting:] Grant (above, wearing a sky blue overcoat) stands atop Orchard Knob and observes through field glasses the Union attack against Missionary Ridge, during the battle for Chattanooga, Tennessee.

[ Photo caption:] Ulysses S. Grant, 1822-1885.

[ Sidebar:] The Memorial

Civil
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 22, 2010
2. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker
- view toward the Capitol and the General Grant Memorial statue, upper left beyond the Reflecting Pool.
War General Grant confidently gazes westward toward the nation’s heartland–and the memorial to his great benefactor, Abraham Lincoln. The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial captures the General’s cool, military bearing while in command astride his favorite warhorse, Cincinnati. Around him swirl the chaos and confusion of the battlefield exhibited by the memorial’s onrushing cavalry and artillery groups.

Dedicated on April 27, 1922, the centennial of Grant’s birth, the memorial blends the work of sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady and architect Edward Pearce Casey, the son of the engineer who completed the Washington Monument. Shrady, self-taught and relatively unknown, won the memorial competition and devoted the final twenty years of his life to the project. Tragically, he died just fifteen days before the dedication, but not before capturing his own likeness within the cavalry grouping as the face of a fallen trooper.

[ Footnote:] Library of Congress (background image, Battle of Chattanooga , November 25, 1863, by Thure de Thadstrup and photo credit, Shrady); The National Archives (photo credit, Grant); The Grant Memorial in Washington (photo credit, Casey image from The Grant Memorial in Washington by The Grant Memorial Commission, 1924).
 
Erected 2009 by National Mall and Memorial Parks - National Park
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker - close up of sidebar image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 22, 2010
3. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker - close up of sidebar
Shrady and Casey.
Service, Department of the Interior.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 53.319′ N, 77° 0.863′ W. Marker was in The National Mall, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker was on 3rd Street, SW just north of Maryland Avenue, SW, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in Union Square at the east end of the Mall, in the grass off the walkway near the southwest corner of the Capitol Reflecting Pool. It is north of Maryland Avenue (open to vehicles with government permits, only) and east of the 3rd St. and Jefferson Dr. intersection. Marker was in this post office area: Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Power from the Wind (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Cardinal Direction Marker: North (about 300 feet away); Witchhazel • Suhwe?t (suh-whet) (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Power from the Wind (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Ulysses S. Grant Memorial (about 600 feet away); James A. Garfield (about 600 feet away); Bartholdi Fountain (about 800 feet away); Restoration of the Land (about 800 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in The National Mall.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
4. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial
To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial. (Submitted on January 23, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. President Ulysses S. Grant. (Submitted on January 23, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Reconstruction
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, US Civil
 
<center>Ulysses S. Grant Memorial (lower middle) - view from the U.S. Capitol's Olmstead Terrace image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, February 21, 2010
5.
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial (lower middle) - view from the U.S. Capitol's Olmstead Terrace
Toward the National Mall and the Washington Monument.
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, circa 1998
6. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial
Equestrian statue of Grant: approx. 17 ft. 2 in. x 8 ft. x 4 ft.; Base: approx. 22 1/2 ft. x 6 ft. 4 ft.; Platform: approx. W. 252 ft. D. 71 ft. (10,700 lbs.). by Vermont Marble Company;the figure of Grant, dressed in his military uniform and slouch hat, seated astride his charger, Cincinnatus; Soldiers carrying flags and rifles march in profile.
(SIRIS, Smithsonian Institution Research Information System,) Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Number IAS 77003157
Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 13, 2016
7. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Marker
The marker has been removed from this location. This photo is from the same location as the nighttime photo of the marker. The Grant monument is undergoing restoration.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,804 times since then and 29 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on September 13, 2016.
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