Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Centerville in Butte County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Centerville School

 
 
Centerville School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 8, 2010
1. Centerville School Marker
Inscription. Erected in 1894 by C.H. Hintz this building was used continuously for school purposes until 1966 when due to unification, pupils were bussed into Chico. The first teacher was Miss Ada Woods. Cost of building was $600.
Purchased by Centerville Recreation and Historical Association Inc. October 9, 1968.
Dedicated in Memory of Cora Woods Hintz
A Former Teacher May 3, 1970
By
Annie E. Bidwell Parlor No.108
Native Daughters of the Golden West

 
Erected 1970 by Annie E. Bidwell Parlor No.108, Native Daughters of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 39° 47.255′ N, 121° 39.394′ W. Marker is in Centerville, California, in Butte County. Marker is on Centerville Road north of North Humbug Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13548 Centerville Road, Chico CA 95928, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Centerville Cemetery (approx. one mile away); Old Paradise Depot (approx. 3 miles away); PFC. Steven J. Walberg-Riotto
Centerville School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 8, 2010
2. Centerville School Marker
The marker is located in front of the schoolhouse.
(approx. 3 miles away); Paradise Veterans Memorial (approx. 3 miles away); Town of Paradise Memorial Trailway (approx. 3 miles away); Old Paradise (approx. 3.3 miles away); Paradise Pioneers (approx. 3.3 miles away); The Dogtown Nugget (approx. 4.3 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Centerville School. The Colman Museum details the history of the school. (Submitted on April 11, 2010.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Centerville School – 1894
Information posted on the kiosk at the Honey Run Covered Bridge

Concerned by the lack of educational resources in the region, a group of parents established the Centerville School District and Board in 1871. The first order of business was to construct a new schoolhouse at the intersection of Nimshew Road and Helltown Road. Construction of the first Centerville School was completed within the year.

By the early 1890ís, a population growth in the area deemed a larger schoolhouse necessary. Charles Hintz, a local saw-mill operator, was commissioned to build the new schoolhouse on his property. The second Centerville School was completed
The Centerville School image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 8, 2010
3. The Centerville School
Charley Hintz, the lumberman who built the schoolhouse, also supplied the lumber for the Honey Run Covered Bridge.
in 1894 on Centerville Road where it continues to stand today. Hintz sold the Schoolhouse and land to the Centerville District for $600 that same year.

After a zoning error was discovered 15 years later showing that much of the land sold by Mr. Hintz belonged to Charles Colman. Mr. Colman donated his property to the Centerville District. The donated land, originally used for a school play yard, eventually became the site of the Colman Museum.
    — Submitted April 11, 2010.

 
Categories. EducationNotable Buildings
 
A Plaque Mounted on the Building image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 8, 2010
4. A Plaque Mounted on the Building
Centerville School
Erected 1894
Declared Historical Site
State of California
Dept. of Parks and Beaches
March 1971
Northside of Schoolhouse image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, April 8, 2010
5. Northside of Schoolhouse
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 883 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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