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Goshen in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Old Stone Schoolhouse

 
 
Old Stone Schoolhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Clifton Patrick, April 12, 2010
1. Old Stone Schoolhouse Marker
Inscription. Built in the 1700ís and used continuously as a school until 1936 when purchased by Minisink Chapter, NSDAR. N.Y. State and National Register of Historic Places
 
Erected by Minisink Chapter DAR 586, National Society DAR.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 41° 22.579′ N, 74° 20.972′ W. Marker is in Goshen, New York, in Orange County. Marker can be reached from New York State Route 17A 0.4 miles from Gibson Rd (County Route 100), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 150 Rte 17A, Goshen NY 10924, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Goshen Emergency Hospital (approx. 1.8 miles away); Horace Pippin (approx. 2.1 miles away); Goshen, Orange Co., N.Y. (approx. 2.1 miles away); Anna Elizabeth Dickinson (approx. 2.2 miles away); 1841 Courthouse (approx. 2.3 miles away); Goshen Half-ShireTown (approx. 2.4 miles away); President Ulysses S. Grant (approx. 2.4 miles away); Randallville (approx. 2.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Goshen.
 
More about this marker.
Secondary sign mounted next to Old Stone Schoolhouse front door image. Click for full size.
By Clifton Patrick, April 12, 2010
2. Secondary sign mounted next to Old Stone Schoolhouse front door
Marker is attached to the front of the Old Stone School House which is partially hidden by roadside foliage.
 
Also see . . .
1. National Register of Historic Places. (Submitted on April 18, 2010, by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States.)
2. District School No. 9 - Wikipedia. (Submitted on April 18, 2010, by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Old Stone Schoolhouse open to public Saturday, August 14, 2010.
By Virginia Moore, Minisink Chapter NDAR Regent. Published in the Times Herald-Record

Unique and beautiful one-room stone schoolhouse sitting amid the trees along Route 17A about two miles south of the village of Goshen will be open to the public from 1-3 p.m. Saturday.

Members of the Minisink Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will greet visitors, delighted to share what life was like for schoolchildren almost three centuries ago.

Students of all ages are welcome to sit at the long wooden desks and not only imagine for a moment what it was like to read from a hornbook and compute sums on a slate, but also to haul water and firewood great distances in order to receive the blessings of an education.

The half-acre parcel upon which the schoolhouse rests was donated for a school site in 1723 by Charles
Old Stone Schoolhouse image. Click for full size.
By Clifton Patrick, April 12, 2010
3. Old Stone Schoolhouse
Howell, a prominent Orange County resident. The school opened sometime in the 1730s or '40s and was used continuously until 1938.

School of many names -

During those two centuries, it had been variously called the Quarry School (for a stone quarry down the road), Borden School (for a nearby creamery), and, eventually and less poetically, Orange County School District No.9. Goshen centralized its school system in 1938, and each of its one-room schoolhouses was placed on the auction block. Fearing the stone school would be leveled, the the Minisink DAR submitted the winning bid of $750.

Members spent the next 18 years lovingly restoring the school, holding their first chapter meeting there in 1957. Chapter meetings continue to be held there in the warmer months.

In 1988, the building now known as the Old Stone Schoolhouse gained New York State and National Historic Register status.

The building is a remarkable example of 18th-century English stone construction. The interior is one large room, which was warmed by a potbellied stove. The restroom facilities still consist of a tiny outhouse in the side yard.

In the Revolutionary era, the road in front of the school was known (ironically) as the King's Highway. Returning to battle from his headquarters in Newburgh, Gen. George Washington is said to have stopped by the school to wish the students
People waiting for their turn to enter Old Stone Schoolhouse Open House. image. Click for full size.
By Leslie Smith, August 14, 2010
4. People waiting for their turn to enter Old Stone Schoolhouse Open House.
well, to encourage them in their studies, and to toss coins their way.

Seward attended classes there

Later, the school was where William H. Seward furthered his education. Although he was a student in the Florida area, he learned that Borden School was open an extra month after his home school had closed for the year. He received permission to attend Borden School and walked three miles each way for the privilege.

Seward later became governor of New York state, and, as secretary of state during the Lincoln administration he secured the purchase of Alaska from Russia, a transaction known at the time as "Seward's Folly." Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted August 14, 2010, by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States.

 
Categories. Colonial EraEducationNotable Buildings
 
Old Stone Schoolhouse interior (2010 open house) image. Click for full size.
By Leslie Smith, August 14, 2010
5. Old Stone Schoolhouse interior (2010 open house)
Old Stone Schoolhouse interior (2010 open house) image. Click for full size.
By Leslie Smith, August 14, 2010
6. Old Stone Schoolhouse interior (2010 open house)
Rear of Old Stone Schoolhouse as viewed from the old outhouse. image. Click for full size.
By Clifton Patrick, August 14, 2010
7. Rear of Old Stone Schoolhouse as viewed from the old outhouse.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States. This page has been viewed 1,468 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Clifton Patrick of Chester, NY, United States. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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