“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)

Henry Jerome Stockard

Henry Jerome Stockard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, April 3, 2010
1. Henry Jerome Stockard Marker
Inscription. Poet, author of "Fugitive Lines" and other works; lifelong educator; president of Peace Institute, 1907-12. Home stood here.
Erected 1953 by Archives Conservation and Highways Department. (Marker Number G 58.)
Location. 36° 5.711′ N, 79° 24.368′ W. Marker is in Burlington, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is at the intersection of North Church Street and Graham-Hopedale Road on North Church Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1845 N. Church Street, Burlington NC 27215, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. J. Spencer Love (approx. half a mile away); Pioneer Plant (approx. ¾ mile away); 1763 Providence (approx. one mile away); Providence Church & Cemetery (approx. one mile away); Camp Alamance (approx. 1.6 miles away); Norfolk & Western Caboose #518654 (approx. 1.7 miles away); Johnston Moves West (approx. 1.7 miles away); North Carolina Railroad (approx. 1.7 miles away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Burlington.
Regarding Henry Jerome Stockard. According to Samuel A'Court Ashe in the book: The Biographical History of North Carolina From
Henry Jerome Stockard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul Jordan, April 3, 2010
2. Henry Jerome Stockard Marker
Marker in front of Thrifty Tire in Burlington, NC
Colonial Times To the Present
, Henry Jerome Stockard was born in Chatham County, North Carolina on September 15, 1858.

He attended Graham High School and later attended the University of North Carolina, where he studied under Professor Thomas Hume. He attended Elon College and graduated from Elon in 1889.

Stockard taught high school in Alamance County, became principal of Graham High School, and then superintendent of Alamance County schools.

Stockard accepted a position as a professor of English and political science at Fredericksburg College in Virginia in 1893.

Stockard came home to North Carolina as a Latin professor at Peace Institute in Raleigh in 1900. He then served as president of Peace Institute until 1912 when Stockard chose to return to his professorship, which he continued until his death in 1914. That year, Wake Forest College awarded him an honorary Litt. D. degree.

Stockard wrote poetry throughout his career. His poetry appeared in Harper’s, Scribner’s, and Atlantic Monthly. , He was hailed as the unofficial poet laureate of North Carolina.

He published two volumes of poetry, "Fugitive Lines" in 1897, and "A Study of Poetry," in 1911. Stockard was asked to compose poems for ceremonies. A poem of Stockard's was read during the unveiling of the North Carolina monument at Appomattox, Virginia, and another at the monument to the women of the Confederacy on Capitol Square in Raleigh.

Stockard was one of the founders of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association.

Stockard died on September 5, 1914 at the age of 55. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh. A portrait of him hangs in the administration building at Peace College.
Additional keywords. Graham High School, Alamance County Schools Superintendent, Poetry, Laureate, Oakwood Cemetery
Categories. 20th CenturyArts, Letters, MusicEducationNotable Persons
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Paul Jordan of Burlington, N. C., U. S. A.. This page has been viewed 851 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Paul Jordan of Burlington, N. C., U. S. A.. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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