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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Beltsville in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of Rhodes’ Tavern

 
 
Site of Rhodes' Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, October 13, 2007
1. Site of Rhodes' Tavern Marker
Inscription. Lieutenant-General George Washington “dined at Rhodes” December 18, 1798, on his last journey from Philadelphia to Mount Vernon.
 
Erected by Maryland Historical Trust.
 
Location. 39° 1.316′ N, 76° 55.517′ W. Marker is in Beltsville, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is at the intersection of Baltimore Avenue (U.S. 1) and South Drive, on the right when traveling south on Baltimore Avenue. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Beltsville MD 20705, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brown’s Tavern (here, next to this marker); Beltsville Agricultural Research Center - West (approx. 0.3 miles away); Van Horn’s Tavern (approx. 1.4 miles away); College Park War Memorial (approx. 1.6 miles away); Ebenezer Meeting House (approx. 2 miles away); Methodist Preaching Place (approx. 2 miles away); Mother Jones (approx. 2.1 miles away); Welcome to the Luther Goldman Birding Trail (approx. 2.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Beltsville.
 
Also see . . .  PG:66-1 Brown's Tavern (White House Tavern, Rhodes' Tavern). Maryland Historical Trust NR-Eligibility Review
Site of Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, October 13, 2007
2. Site of Tavern
Form, 1999.

"The original section of the Tavern was owned by William Evans in 1798, and operated by Thomas Roades (or Rhodes); it was sometimes known as Rhodes' tavern. George Washington recorded in his diary that he dined at Rhodes' Tavern, 18 December 1798, on his return trip from Philadelphia to Mt. Vernon. William Evans bequeathed the tavern to his daughter in 1807, and she in turn sold it in 1830 to the Stockton and Stokes stagecoach company, (Which has been cited as "the greatest stagecoach company in the eastern states.") The tavern and farm were purchased in 1835 by John W. Brown, who probably built the main section shortly thereafter; he continued to operate a tavern there, and his descendants retained it until 1913. The present owner, who acquired the property in 1940, has built 50 brick cottage units, and the complex is now known as the Del Haven "White House" Hotel. The old Post road milestone, 25 to B (altimore), is still on the grounds, just south of the building." -- Statement of Significance, p.15 (Submitted on August 6, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Brown's Tavern image. Click for full size.
Maryland Historical Trust (Historic Sites Survey), May 1988
3. Brown's Tavern
Note the historic marker to the right of the building.
Site of Rhodes’ Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 4, 2013
4. Site of Rhodes’ Tavern Marker
In front of Sarku Japan restaurant
Site of tavern image. Click for full size.
By Geoff Marsh, February 9, 2008
5. Site of tavern
Site of tavern showing foundation stones and markers for both Rhode’s tavern (to the right) and Brown’s tavern (to the left).
25 M to B marker <br>& the Site of Rhodes' Tavern marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 4, 2013
6. 25 M to B marker
& the Site of Rhodes' Tavern marker
25 M to B image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 4, 2013
7. 25 M to B
The only remaining milemarker on the 1813 Baltimore Washington Turnpike.
25 M to B image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 4, 2013
8. 25 M to B
Brown's Tavern Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 4, 2013
9. Brown's Tavern Plaque
This plaque and garden commemorate the site of Brown’s Tavern, a Prince George’s County Historic Site that served travelers on the former Baltimore-Washington turnpike from the early 1830’s to the early 1990’s. It was constructed and owned by the stagecoach company of Richard Stockton and William B. Stokes. John Brown purchased the tavern in 1835 and operated it until his death in 1862. The tavern was the centerpiece of the Del Haven White House Motel and Cottages, which opened in the early 1940’s. The deteriorated structure was demolished in November 2001.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,860 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by Christopher Busta-Peck of Shaker Heights, Ohio.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Geoff Marsh of Beltsville, Maryland.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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