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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Nacogdoches in Nacogdoches County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

“The Treaty”

sculpted by Michael Boyett

 
 
"The Treaty" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Gustafson, March 31, 2010
1. "The Treaty" Marker
Inscription. The date was February 23, 1836, and the situation for Texas was desperate. Santa Anna with about 6,000 troops was on the march towards the Alamo with the intent of smashing the small, poorly-organized, and ill-equipped army of Texans along with their fledgling government. Fearing an alliance between Mexico and the Indian tribes, the Texas government sent its envoys to meet with the East Texas tribes, hoping to negotiate a treaty designed to keep them from fighting on the side of Mexico and remaining neutral.

Nacogdoches residents, Sam Houston, Adolphus Sterne, and William Goyens, represented Texas in the negotiations, with Chief Bowles representing the Indian tribes. When the time came to sign the treaty, General Houston and John Forbes represented Texas, and Bowles, Cherokee Chief, spoke for the Indian tribes. Houston and Bowles were longtime friends and highly respected by one another and their peoples as leaders and men of integrity. Houston had become a member of the Cherokee nation, and many years before was given the title "The Raven", meaning "good luck". These men were warrior leaders who had proved their courage on the battlefield. Houston was the newly-commissioned commander of the army of Texas and Bowles, though over 80 years of age, was war chief of not only the Cherokees, but also the other 12 tribes represented.

During
"The Treaty" image. Click for full size.
By Steve Gustafson, March 31, 2010
2. "The Treaty"
the negotiations, Houston presented gifts to Bowles, including a sash, sword, red silk vest, and long dress-shirt, which the chief wore proudly at the signing. The document, which was signed on the back page, was decorated with bright ribbons, and each chief made his "X" in its appropriate places.
 
Erected 2003 by Historic Nacogdoches, Inc.
 
Location. 31° 36.09′ N, 94° 39.03′ W. Marker is in Nacogdoches, Texas, in Nacogdoches County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Lanana Street, on the right when traveling east on Main Street. Click for map. The statue and marker are located in Eugenia Sterne Park. Marker is in this post office area: Nacogdoches TX 75961, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Eugenia Sterne Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Bivouac and Banquet for The New Orleans' Greys (within shouting distance of this marker); Home of Adolphus Sterne (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Haden Edwards (about 600 feet away); Oak Grove Cemetery (about 700 feet away); John S. Roberts (approx. 0.2 miles away); Charles Standfield Taylor (approx. 0.2 miles away); Texas Stagecoaches, C.S.A. (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Nacogdoches.
 
Also see . . .
San Houston/Chief Bowles Statue Donor Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Steve Gustafson, March 31, 2010
3. San Houston/Chief Bowles Statue Donor Plaque
This statue of Sam Houston and Chief Bowles was made possible by the generous contributions of many individuals, families, and businesses in our community. The following gave extraordinary support to this effort.
[ Individuals, businesses and The Foundation are listed. ]
 Bowl (Chief Bowles). Biography of Chief Bowles in the Handbook of Texas online, which mentions the Treaty of 1836. It says the he was "peace chief" of the Cherokees and that the treaty was later invalidated by the Republic of Texas. (Submitted on May 2, 2010, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNative AmericansNotable EventsNotable PersonsSettlements & SettlersWar, Texas Independence
 
Close-up of the Chief Bowles and Sam Houston statue. image. Click for full size.
By Steve Gustafson, March 31, 2010
4. Close-up of the Chief Bowles and Sam Houston statue.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Steve Gustafson of Lufkin, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,057 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Steve Gustafson of Lufkin, Texas. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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