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Park Ridge in Bergen County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Dutch of Bergen County

 
 
The Dutch of Bergen County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2010
1. The Dutch of Bergen County Marker
Inscription. “Bergen County is chiefly inhabited by Dutch people. There is a peculiar neatness in appearance of their homes, having an airy stoop supported by pillars in front, and their kitchens at the ends in the form of wings. The land is good and the soil fertile; being generally advantageously cultivated. The people appear to enjoy ease and a happy competency.”
- Dr. Thacher passing through Bergen County in 1776.


“No people are more respected for honesty and uprightness of character than the Americans of Dutch extraction; but they are not reckoned so enterprising as the other classes of the inhabitants. There are individuals in the country even now, who can hardly speak a word of English; and Mr. Taylor, and all the clergymen of the Dutch congregations in this neighborhood, preach, at certain times, in the Dutch language.”
- James Stuart, Three Years in North America, 1833


Although the Dutch came to New Jersey seeking trade opportunities, agriculture quickly became more important than trade once permanent towns were mapped out in the areas west of the Hudson River. The village of Bergen was settled in 1660. It was one of the earliest permanent centers of Dutch settlement. Some who came had been farmers on Long Island, but many were recent arrivals from
Markers at the Wortendyke Barn image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2010
2. Markers at the Wortendyke Barn
Several markers are found near the Dutch barn. The Dutch of Bergen County marker is seen here on the right.
Europe.

Starting first in the lowlands along the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers and then moving up onto the Piedmont Plain and the Highlands, settlers hurried to clear forests to farm the rich soil.

The descendants of the first Dutch in New Jersey came to be respected as among the best farmers in the colonies. Emigration from Holland nearly ceased following the English conquest of the area in 1664, but the strong Dutch presence and agricultural prosperity already established continued under English rule. The Dutch found that they could grow virtually all of the same field crops, vegetables, fruits and livestock they remembered in the Netherlands. Many varieties of food plants came directly from their homeland.

Local conditions also encouraged the development of new varieties such as the Double Paradise apple of Bergen County and special varieties of cider apples grown in Essex and Bergen counties.

- Even today the influence of the Dutch settlers is all around us in familiar names
Van Allen • Bowery • Tappan • Holland Tunnel • Ackerman • Van Riper • Dutch Treat • Kinderkamack Road • Hohokus • Demarest • Paramus • Bowling • Garretson • Wychoff • Closter • Bogert • Van Wagoner • Dutch Oven • Ramsey • Dutcher • Tice • Lyndhurst • Voorbis • Hopper • Dutch Door • Westervelt • Dutch Uncle • Skating • Bergen • Dutchman’s Breeches • Dutch Courage •
The Wortendyke Dutch Barn image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2010
3. The Wortendyke Dutch Barn
This Dutch style barn found near the marker pre-dates the American Revolution.
Harlem • Cruller • Staten Island

 
Location. 41° 1.718′ N, 74° 2.725′ W. Marker is in Park Ridge, New Jersey, in Bergen County. Marker is on Pascack Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Park Ridge NJ 07656, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Between Two Brooks – The Wortendyke Barn (here, next to this marker); The Wortendykes (here, next to this marker); Wortendyke Dutch Barn (within shouting distance of this marker); Wortendyke Homestead (within shouting distance of this marker); Peter P. Post House (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pascack Reformed Church (approx. Ό mile away); Atkins Glen (approx. half a mile away); Pascack Historical Society Museum (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Park Ridge.
 
More about this marker. A map of New Jersey and surrounding states appears on the left side of the marker. A Dutch family sitting around a table is on the marker’s upper right.
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Dutch Barn on Pascack Road image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2010
4. Dutch Barn on Pascack Road
The Wortendyke Farmhouse image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 18, 2010
5. The Wortendyke Farmhouse
This house, located across the street from the marker, was built in 1770, the same year as the barn.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,012 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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