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Vinings in Cobb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station

 
 
The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2010
1. The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker
Inscription. June 5, 1864. When Johnston’s army [CS] withdrew from Smyrna to the river, Howard’s 4th A. C., and Baird's div. (14th A.C.), [US] via highway and R. R. occupied Vining’s. Baird’s troops kept on down the R. R. until halted by Johnston’s River Line.

4th A.C. troops pursued the Confederate wagon trains, escorted by Wheeler’s Cav., toward the pontoon bridge at Pace’s Ferry where they crossed the river. Morgan’s 7th Ind. Battery [US] shelled the column from Vining’s Hill.

Also, from this eminence, Generals Sherman, Thomas and Baird, had their first view of Atlanta, across the Chattahoochee, 9.5 mi. S. E.
 
Erected 1988 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 033-83.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 51.958′ N, 84° 28.104′ W. Marker is in Vinings, Georgia, in Cobb County. Marker is on Paces Ferry Road NW 0 miles west of New Paces Ferry Road SE, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is located at the old Vinings railroad station, now a restaurant. Marker is in this post office area: Atlanta GA 30339, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles
The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2010
2. The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker
Looking east on Paces Ferry Road, in the direction of the Chattahoochee River
of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site: Hardy Pace’s Res. Howard’s Headquarters (approx. 0.2 miles away); The 4th Corps Posted Along the River (approx. 0.8 miles away); The 14th & 20th A.C. Cross at Pace's Ferry (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named The 14th & 20th A.C. Cross at Pace’s Ferry (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Errant Pontoon Bridge: Paces Ferry (approx. 0.9 miles away); Old Pace’s Ferry Road (approx. one mile away); Palmer’s & Hooker’s A.C. Cross the Chattahoochee (approx. 1.1 miles away); Union Defense Line (approx. 1.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Vinings.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced an earlier marker of the same title and almost identical text at this location, erected by the Georgia Historical Commission.
 
Regarding The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station. There is a factual error on the marker: The events described occurred on July 5th 1864, not June 5th. The earlier marker had the correct date.
 
Additional comments.
1. Marker missing?
It appears the marker is now missing. There has been remodeling of the nearby building and the marker was there at least in October, 2012.
    — Submitted
The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2010
3. The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker
Looking west on Paces Ferry Road, toward the railroad tracks
May 24, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, April 1, 2010
4. The 4th Corps at Vining’s Station Marker
Looking north toward the marker. Vinings Mountain is in the background; the site where Generals Sherman, Thomas and Baird had their first view of Atlanta is now occupied by a high-rise office tower.
Marker no longer there....? image. Click for full size.
By Google Street View, February 2016
5. Marker no longer there....?
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,210 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   5. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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