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Fort Totten in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Totten

 
 
Fort Totten Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
1. Fort Totten Marker
Inscription. One of the Civil War defenses of Washington construction of Fort Totten was begun in August 1861, named after Gen. Joseph G. Totten the fort contained 20 guns and mortars including eight 32-pounders.

United States Department of the Interior
National Parks Service
 
Erected by United States Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 56.842′ N, 77° 0.317′ W. Marker is in Fort Totten, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Fort Totten Drive NE, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located at the edge of the Fort Totten earthworks inside Fort Totten Park. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20011, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Totten (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Fort Totten (about 500 feet away); Memorial Day Order (approx. 0.3 miles away); St. Paul's Episcopal (approx. 0.4 miles away); St. Paul's Episcopal Church (approx.
Joseph G. Totten, Brevet Major General, U.S. Army image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress, circa 1864
2. Joseph G. Totten, Brevet Major General, U.S. Army
0.4 miles away); U. S. Soldiers' Home (approx. half a mile away); President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home (approx. half a mile away); Ukrainian Catholic National Shrine (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Totten.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Totten. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on October 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Joseph Gilbert Totten - Wikipedia. (Submitted on February 19, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Marker on a Boulder next to Fort Totten Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
3. Marker on a Boulder next to Fort Totten Earthworks
External Trenchworks image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
4. External Trenchworks
Some of the trenches outside the fort proper can be seen in traces today. During the Civil War, the area around the fort was cleared, with abatis and other obstacles placed along likely enemy approach routes. Outer trenchworks supported the main fort by protecting the blind sides from enemy advances.
Fort Walls image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
5. Fort Walls
The fort walls can easily be made out in the woods, and are still a steep walk along the park trails.
Civil War Photograph of Soliders at the Gate to Fort Totten image. Click for full size.
Civil War Photographs, Library of Congress
6. Civil War Photograph of Soliders at the Gate to Fort Totten
This gate stood not far from where the marker is today, and was the only entrance to the fort. (Civil War photographs, 1861-1865 / compiled by Hirst D. Milhollen and Donald H. Mugridge, Washington, D.C. : Library of Congress, 1977. No. 0774)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,120 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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