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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Old Exchange

 
 
The Old Exchange Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 1991
1. The Old Exchange Marker
Inscription.
Commissioned in 1767
by Act of
The General Assembly of
The British Colony of South Carolina
Completed in 1771
Deeded in 1917
by The United States Congress
to the South Carolina State Society
National Society
Daughters of the American Revolution
to be held in trust for
The Rebecca Motte Chapter DAR

 
Erected 1990 by the South Carolina State Society, NSDAR.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.612′ N, 79° 55.622′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on East Bay Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 122 E Bay St, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Convention on Ratification (a few steps from this marker); One Broad Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Walker, Evans & Cogswell Company (within shouting distance of this marker); Lee Cohen Harby (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Bank of the United States
The Old Exchange Marker<br>Far Right Marker Reads image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 20, 2011
2. The Old Exchange Marker
Far Right Marker Reads
Designated an
Historic Customhouse
by
U.S. Commissioner of Customs
Myles J. Ambrose
January 27, 1972
(within shouting distance of this marker); As Old as Charleston (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Farmers and Exchange Bank (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Charleston.
 
Regarding The Old Exchange. ... In Charleston, enslaved African Americans were customarily sold on the north side of the Old Exchange Building. An 1856 city ordinance prohibited this practice of public sales, resulting in the opening of the Old Slave Mart and a number of other sales rooms, yards, or marts along Chalmers, State and Queen Streets.

 
Also see . . .
1. The History Of The Old Exchange. The Old Exchange Building housed the Charleston Post Office from 1815 to 1896 with brief interruptions due to earthquake and war. (Submitted on March 29, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. National Historic Landmark Website. The Old Exchange page on the National Historic Landmark website. (Submitted on October 26, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.) 

3. Jewish Women's Archive: Leah Cohen Harby
The Old Exchange, 122 Bay St. in Charleston image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 1991
3. The Old Exchange, 122 Bay St. in Charleston
. (Submitted on April 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
4. Exchange and Provost. The Exchange and Provost Building, built 1767-1771, served during the last quarter of the 18th century as a customhouse, public market, public meeting place, military prison and barracks. (Submitted on December 13, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional keywords. Customhouse; Provost Dungeon; Slavery; Lee Cohen Harby.
 
Categories. Colonial EraFraternal or Sororal OrganizationsIndustry & CommerceLandmarksNotable Buildings
 
The Old Exchange Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
4. The Old Exchange Marker
The Old Exchange Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
5. The Old Exchange Marker
South Carolina Voted to ratify the Federal Constitution in this building on May 23, 1788. Among the 100 members of the convention on ratification wre Charles Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and John Rutledge, three of the four South Carolinians who had served as Delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Erected by the South Carolina State Society of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
The Old Exchange Marker image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 16, 2009
6. The Old Exchange Marker
Tribute to Lee Cohen Harby - plaque on the north exterior of the Old Exchange Bldg. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 17, 2010
7. Tribute to Lee Cohen Harby - plaque on the north exterior of the Old Exchange Bldg.
"In memory of Lee Cohen Harby 1849 - 1918 who by her patriotic and untiring efforts secured this building for the Daughters of the American Revolution of South Carolina as a gift from the United States Government. May 9, 1917 --------- A tribute from the Daughters of the American Revolution of South Carolina 1924"
The Old Exchange Bldg. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, April 17, 2010
8. The Old Exchange Bldg.
Designated an
Historic Customhouse
by
U.S. Commissioner of Customs
Myles J. Ambrose
January 27, 1972
The Old Exchange in Charleston image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 8, 2013
9. The Old Exchange in Charleston
The Old Exchange Historic American Engineering Record image. Click for full size.
Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles N. Bayless, July 1984
10. The Old Exchange Historic American Engineering Record
Habs SC,10-CHAR,72--11
Old Exchange and Custom House 1865 image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher
11. Old Exchange and Custom House 1865
[Charleston, S.C. The Post Office (old Exchange and Custom House, 122 East Bay), Barnard, George, 1865 Courtesy of the Library of Congress
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,293 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   9. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   10. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   11. submitted on , by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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