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Appomattox Court House in Appomattox County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Education in 1800's Rural Virginia

Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail

 

—Appomattox, Virginia - Appomattox County —

 
Education in 1800's Rural Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
1. Education in 1800's Rural Virginia Marker
Inscription. Before and during the Civil War, educational opportunities in Rural Virginia were often limited. The wealthier families employed a tutor or sent their children to boarding academies such as the nearby Union Academy. In such schools students learned a variety of subjects including history, mathematics, chemistry, and foreign languages. For less fortunate white children prior to the 1860's, there were 19 small, mostly one-room schoolhouses scattered throughout the county. African-American children had even fewer educational prospects.

Here on April 9, 1865, two brigades of United States Colored Troops advanced east along the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road, ensuring the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate army and the end of the Civil War. This brought about the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment on December 6, 1865. Before that time it was illegal to teach a slave to read. The first educational opportunities for blacks in Appomattox County came about through the Freedman's Bureau, created by Congress to assist former slaves. From 1866 to 1869. Plymouth Rock, a school for freedmen, operated near the Courthouse. However, funding was erratic for African-American schools, causing educational prospects for blacks to remain scarce in the years following the Civil War. It was not until 1870-1871 that Virginia made funds available
Education in 1800's Rural Virginia Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, April 18, 2010
2. Education in 1800's Rural Virginia Marker
for public education for persons of all races, resulting in a dramatic increase in the number of both white and black children who attended school. It would be nearly another hundred years though, until the gap between educational opportunities for the two races would finally be closed.
 
Erected by Civil Rights In Education Heritage Trail®. (Marker Number 3.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 37° 22.519′ N, 78° 48.352′ W. Marker is in Appomattox Court House, Virginia, in Appomattox County. Click for map. Marker is located at the North Carolina Memorial wayside in Appomattox Court House National Historical Park. Marker is in this post office area: Appomattox VA 24522, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Raine Cemetery and Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); North Carolina (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Strategic Delay (about 800 feet away); Appomattox Court House Confederate Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Raine Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Appomattox (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Cemetery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sears Lane (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Appomattox Court House.
 
More about this marker. In the upper left is An 1892 photograph from the west showing the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road as it passes in front of the McLean House. On the lower left is an illustration of the village of Appomattox Court House as it appeared in 1865. In the upper right is a photo of Appomattox Court House as it looked at the time of the surrender. Sketched by R. K. Sneden. On the lower right is a map of south-central Virginia showing other schools highlighted on the Civil Rights in Education Heritage Trail.
 
Categories. African AmericansEducation
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,396 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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