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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pickens in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Civilian Conservation Corps

1933-1942

 
 
Civilian Conservation Corps Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 27, 2010
1. Civilian Conservation Corps Marker
Inscription.
Erected in appreciation of the effort, skill and dedication of the men of the Civilian Conservation Corps.

This peacetime army healed the scars on our landscape, beautified and protected our mountains, seashores and forests, and created the foundation of South Carolina's state park system.

While forging an outstanding record in the conservation of human and natural resources, this program left us and future generations a legacy of immeasurable value.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 35° 1.668′ N, 82° 41.717′ W. Marker is in Pickens, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from Table Rock State Park Road. Click for map. Marker is located near the main entrance to the Lodge at Table Rock. Marker is in this post office area: Pickens SC 29671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A CCC Classic (here, next to this marker); Parkitecture (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named The Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 0.4 miles away); Beliefs Set in Stone (approx. half a mile away); Granite and Gravity
Table Rock Lodge image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 27, 2010
2. Table Rock Lodge
(approx. half a mile away); Table Rock State Park (approx. 0.6 miles away); Pumpkintown (approx. 3 miles away); Cornelius Keith - 1715-1808 (approx. 3.3 miles away); Cornelius Keith (approx. 3.8 miles away); Oolenoy Baptist Church (approx. 3.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pickens.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civilian Conservation Corps. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a public work relief program for unemployed young men age 18-24, providing unskilled manual labor related to the conservation and development of natural resources in rural areas of the United States from 1933 to 1942. (Submitted on April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Civilian Conservation Corps Legacy. The Civilian Conservation Corps Legacy represents the alumni of America and strives to bring awareness to the heritage of the CCC, CCC alumni, their programs and accomplishments. (Submitted on April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. WGBH Ampercian Experience: The Civilian Conservation Corps. One of the most popular New Deal programs,
Robert Fechner<br><i>Time Magazine</i>, February 6, 1939 image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
3. Robert Fechner
Time Magazine, February 6, 1939
the CCC put three million young men to work in camps across America during the height of the Great Depression. (Submitted on April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Robert Fechner. Robert Fechner (22 March 1876 - 31 December 1939) was a national labor union leader and director of the Civilian Conservation Corps (1933–39), which played a central role in the development of state and national parks in the United States. (Submitted on April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Arlington National Cemetery - Robert Fechner Entry. Born on March 22, 1876, he was an organized labor leader for much of his life. (Submitted on April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. James McEntee. James Joseph McEntee (19 September 1884 – 13 October 1957) was an American machinist and labor leader who served as the second director of the Civilian Conservation Corps from 26 February 1940 until it was terminated in 1942. (Submitted on April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Summary of CCC Projects
3,470 fire towers erected
97,000 miles of fire roads built
4,235,000 man-days devoted to fighting fires
3 billion trees planted
7,153,000 man days expended on protecting the natural habitats of wildlife
84,400,000 acres of good agricultural land receive manmade drainage systems
1,240,000 man-days of emergency work completed during floods of the Ohio and Mississippi valleys
disease and insect control
forest improvement — timber stand inventories, surveying, and reforestation
forest recreation development — campgrounds built, complete with picnic shelters, swimming pools, fireplaces, and restrooms

(Source: http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1586.html.)
    — Submitted April 29, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkGovernmentNatural Resources
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 785 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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